The Eagles Reviews

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Eagles : The Very Best Of (2CD)

Review 33 career-spanning hits and album favorites on 2 CDs. Includes Take It Easy; Witchy Woman; Peaceful Easy Feeling; Desperado; Already Gone; James Dean; The Best of My Love; Lyin' Eyes; One of These Nights; Take It to the Limit; Hotel California; Life in the Fast Lane , and more. Unbeatable!
The Very Best Of Fleetwood Mac (2CD)

Review This packed double-disc is the slim option for fans who find the Eagles' vaunted greatest hits sets too little and the boxed set too hefty. Hit singles large and medium are here, often ("One of These Nights," "Hotel California") still sounding definitive and even tough. Large helpings of favorite album cuts are also included, along with a taster from a promised 2004 Eagles studio reunion. Unfortunately, "Hole in the World," Don Henley's response to September 11, feels just as empty and entitled as "Get Over It," the band's previous state-of-the-union message (from which the newer song represents a philosophical 180-degree turn). But for those seeking an overview of this Southern California juggernaut's successes, as well as telling comments from band members--mostly Henley and Frey--in a well-designed booklet, Very Best will more than do. --Rickey Wright
Chronicle: The 20 Greatest Hits

Review

Given the extraordinary amount of airplay HOTEL CALIFORNIA garnered in the mid-70s and early 80s, it comes as quite a surprise to hear how fresh this recording sounds on DCC's 24k gold disc version. Familiar tracks benefit from the enhanced soundstage and control room-clarity of this exceptional digital remastering, revealing something of the actual recording studio room sound on many tracks.

Certified Multi-Platinum (16 times) by the RIAA. (3/01)


Ultimate Hits: Rock And Roll Never Forgets

Review It's no accident that The Eagles Greatest Hits might one day pass Michael Jackson's Thriller as the best-selling album of all time-- the Eagles made great singles. By contrast, their albums could be spotty and strained by self-conscious artistry. Hotel California was arguably the band's best single album--it was certainly the Eagles' biggest original disc-- and it also underscored the band's need to make a big statement. The title tune reflected the album's theme of paradise lost in California, painting this picture with a musical arrangement that punctuated strumming guitars with dramatic drums, and perhaps the band's most famous lyric: "You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave." "New Kid in Town" was an equally fine albeit much more traditional Eagles ballad. "Life in the Fast Lane" aspired to hard rock but largely gunned its engine without taking off. The rest is okay, but nothing more than secondary Eagles songs that happened to be nestled into the album that came to define the `70s supergroup. --John Milward
Lynyrd Skynyrd - All Time Greatest Hits

Review These songs sum up a time-the early '70s-and a place-southern California-better than just about anything could. Take It Easy; Witchy Woman; Already Gone; One of These Nights; Take It to the Limit; Peaceful, Easy Feeling; Desperado; Best of My Love and more.
The Very Best of Chicago: Only the Beginning

Review The pre-Hotel California years were arguably the best for The Eagles (though there were, thanks to Joe Walsh, some stellar future moments). Their mix of country, folk, and rock had a harder, grittier edge, and helped define what would become known as the Southern California sound. There was just enough of a country feel in the beautiful harmonies of "Best of My Love," to blur the edges between the genres. "Take It Easy" and "Lyin' Eyes" could easily have come out of the new Nashville school, as well. The twang that characterizes the guitar intro to "Already Gone" and the leads in "Witchy Woman" and "One of These Nights," also pays tribute to country's guitar greats. Greatest Hits 1971-1975 houses a scant ten singles, but not only does it illustrate the magic of the collaboration between Glen Frey and Don Henley, it shows the breadth of The Eagles impact on the many who would follow their lead. --Steve Gdula
Greatest Hits - ICON

Review The Studio Albums 1972-1979 (6xCD) contains all six of the Eagles' Asylum studio albums from 1972 - 1979 - Eagles, Desperado, On The Border, One Of These Nights, Hotel California, & The Long Run - all packaged in a sleek, black clamshell box, with the albums in paper mini-jackets utlizing recycled paper stock.
The Very Best of The Doobie Brothers

Review History of the Eagles
• 3 Disc DVD in 5.1 Surround Sound and Stereo
• Packaged in a six-panel digipak with accompanying photo booklet.
• 4 hours of never before seen material from the past 40 years.
• Disc One: Part One explores the creation and rise to fame in the 1970’s through their breakup in 1980.
• Disc Two: Part Two details the band’s reunion in 1994 through the Hell Freezes Over tour to present day.
• Bonus Disc: Exclusive concert, Eagles Live at the Capital Centre March 1977.
• Directed by Alison Ellwood, along with Producer and Academy Award-winning documentarian, Alex Gibney.
Best Of The Doobies, The

Review Two CD set, 33 tracks. With a career spanning over four decades The Eagles are among the most successful Rock 'N' Roll acts of all time. The original Eagles compilation, Their Greatest Hits 1971-1975, remains one of the best-selling records of all time and this updated two CD collection contains all the same hallmarks that made it so successful, with some welcome surprises. The staple recordings remain, with 'Hotel California' the most immediately recognizable, as well as hits like 'Lyin' Eyes' and 'New Kid in Town'. Also included is their single 'Hole in the World', written as a response to the 9/11 terrorist attacks. Like many of The Eagles' songs, the difficult and confrontational subject matter is softened by their trademark vocal harmonies.
The Very Best Of

Review Certified Multi-Platinum (4 times) by the RIAA. (3/01)
Ultimate Creedence Clearwater Revival: Greatest Hits & All-Time Classics [3CD]

Review The Eagles exploded on the charts in 1975 with One of These Nights, the first of four straight albums by the band to reach No. 1. The album was their most varied to date, with the discofied title track, the stately waltz "Take It To the Limit," and the tough, cynical country rocker "Lyin' Eyes." The album contains a couple of unusual numbers as well, including Bernie Leadon's psychedelic banjo showcase "Journey of the Sorcerer" and "I Wish You Peace," which Leadon wrote with his then-girlfriend, future first daughter (by virtue of her parents, Ron and Nancy Reagan) and nude model (courtesy of Playboy), Patti Davis. --Daniel Durchholz
Hotel California

Review Certified Multi-Platinum (2 times) by the RIAA. (3/01)
One of These Nights

Review If ever a group of musicians had a clear vision of where they wanted to go and how to get there, it was these southern California boys who built a steady rolling FM hit factory on basic tenets of Gram Parsons's invention of country-rock. For their second album, the group decided concept was most important and set out to portray themselves as keepers of the old West--their outlaw image a natural for those born unto rock and roll soil. The hits are lazy, decadent, and unrepentant; "Tequila Sunrise" and the title track, feature the flawless harmonies and strong vocals of Glenn Frey and Don Henley. --Rob O'Connor
Their Greatest Hits

Review The long-awaited followup to Hotel California and the Eagles' last studioalbum proved a considerable disappointment, though it sold in the expected multimillions and included the hits Heartache Tonight, The Long Run, and I Can't Tell You Why.

Certified Mult-Platinum (7 times) by the RIAA. (3/01)


Desperado

Review Certified Multi-Platinum (2 times) by the RIAA. (3/01)
The Long Run

Review On their third album, the Eagles finally produced a No. 1 hit with "The Best of My Love," but most of On the Border is marked by tough rockers, not sweet ballads. "Already Gone" is a brusque kiss-off and "Midnight Flyer" a bluegrass kicker, while "James Dean" recalls the '50s rebel icon, and the title track reflects on paranoia and creeping Big Brotherism. The Eagles also cover a Tom Waits tune, "Ol' 55," and pay tribute to alt-country godfather Gram Parsons on "My Man." The album title is prophetic in the sense that the band that made this record (bolstered by the addition of guitarist Don Felder) was on the verge of greatness, but not quite there yet. --Daniel Durchholz
On the Border

Review 33 career-spanning hits and album favorites on 2 CDs. Includes Take It Easy; Witchy Woman; Peaceful Easy Feeling; Desperado; Already Gone; James Dean; The Best of My Love; Lyin' Eyes; One of These Nights; Take It to the Limit; Hotel California; Life in the Fast Lane , and more. Unbeatable!
Eagles

Review This packed double-disc is the slim option for fans who find the Eagles' vaunted greatest hits sets too little and the boxed set too hefty. Hit singles large and medium are here, often ("One of These Nights," "Hotel California") still sounding definitive and even tough. Large helpings of favorite album cuts are also included, along with a taster from a promised 2004 Eagles studio reunion. Unfortunately, "Hole in the World," Don Henley's response to September 11, feels just as empty and entitled as "Get Over It," the band's previous state-of-the-union message (from which the newer song represents a philosophical 180-degree turn). But for those seeking an overview of this Southern California juggernaut's successes, as well as telling comments from band members--mostly Henley and Frey--in a well-designed booklet, Very Best will more than do. --Rickey Wright
Rumours

Review

Given the extraordinary amount of airplay HOTEL CALIFORNIA garnered in the mid-70s and early 80s, it comes as quite a surprise to hear how fresh this recording sounds on DCC's 24k gold disc version. Familiar tracks benefit from the enhanced soundstage and control room-clarity of this exceptional digital remastering, revealing something of the actual recording studio room sound on many tracks.

Certified Multi-Platinum (16 times) by the RIAA. (3/01)


Hell Freezes Over

Review It's no accident that The Eagles Greatest Hits might one day pass Michael Jackson's Thriller as the best-selling album of all time-- the Eagles made great singles. By contrast, their albums could be spotty and strained by self-conscious artistry. Hotel California was arguably the band's best single album--it was certainly the Eagles' biggest original disc-- and it also underscored the band's need to make a big statement. The title tune reflected the album's theme of paradise lost in California, painting this picture with a musical arrangement that punctuated strumming guitars with dramatic drums, and perhaps the band's most famous lyric: "You can check out any time you like, but you can never leave." "New Kid in Town" was an equally fine albeit much more traditional Eagles ballad. "Life in the Fast Lane" aspired to hard rock but largely gunned its engine without taking off. The rest is okay, but nothing more than secondary Eagles songs that happened to be nestled into the album that came to define the `70s supergroup. --John Milward

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