Teresa Wright Reviews

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The Miracle On 34Th Street

Review John Grisham's The Rainmaker (DVD)

Francis Ford Coppola directs and scripts an exciting, star-packed adapta tion of John Grisham's novel about an idealistic young attor ney who tak es on the case of a lifetime. Matt Damon (Good Will Hunting) plays Rudy Baylor, a rookie lawyer in over his head on a hig h-profile case. Opposi ng him: an army of seasoned legal sharks (led by Jon Voight). On Rudy's side: Deck Shifflet (Danny DeVito), a feisty "paralawyer" who specialize s in flunking the bar exam. Rudy's chances are slim to none- until he un covers a trail of corrupti on that might lead to the one thing that coul d win his case: the truth.

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Miracle on 34th Street (1947)

Review Snowbound womenfolk wait as three brothers from a farm family go after a killer cat.
A Christmas Carol in Color!

Review You never see the title character in William Wellman's Track of the Cat--a black panther terrorizing the land and herd of a frontier family--which is just one of the many bold strokes of this ambitious movie. The intruder claims not merely cattle but also one family member, so middle son (and unquestioned alpha male) Robert Mitchum goes out in the dead of winter to bag the cat. Meanwhile, the tensions inside the ranch house are distilled from Greek tragedy with a large dollop of Freud: harridan mother Beulah Bondi (good performance) wants her sons to remain unmarried, despite the fact that youngest boy Tab Hunter has fallen for a forward lass played by Diana Lynn. Teresa Wright--almost unrecognizable as the spinster sister--speaks for sanity and modern thinking. Track is the second film Wellman made from a novel by Walter Van Tilburg Clark; the first was The Ox-Bow Incident, that equally serious and offbeat Western about lynch violence. For this one, Wellman admitted that one of his motivations was a long-held desire to make a color film that was essentially black-and-white; the snowy backdrops of the exteriors (shot spectacularly around Washington State's Mount Rainier) offered that chance. It's a very exactingly directed movie, both indoors and out, and qualifies as an experiment in mise-en-scene; but experiments in mise-en-scene have rarely translated into box-office success, and Track of the Cat was no exception. One problem: despite Mitchum's robust presence, his solitary journey (which could be covered in interior monologue in a novel) is rather inscrutable. The spiky script is by A.I. Bezzerides, who would do Kiss Me, Deadly a year later. By the way, Wellman later regretted not showing the cat--but he was right the first time. It's an eerie touch in a movie that gets under your skin. --Robert Horton
Miracle On 34th Street

Review Joseph Cotton star as Uncle Charlie, a calculating and charming killer who hides out in his relatives' small hometown. There, he befriends his favorite niece and namesake, Young Charlie (Teresa Wright). But she begins to suspect he may be the famed Merry Widow murderer. A deadly game of cat and mouse ensues as the psychopathic killer plots the death of his young niece to protect his secret.
It's A Wonderful Life (Black & White Version)

Review Two generations of lovers struggle to determine whether practicality or passion should guide their fate in this "heartwarming and delightful" (The Hollywood Reporter) tale. Starring Academy AwardÂ(r) winners* David Niven and Teresa Wright and "filmed with tenderness and rhythmic beauty" (Cue), Enchantment casts a captivating spell! As a young man, Rollo (Niven) was kept from his true love, Lark (Wright), by the scheming of his spiteful older sister. Years later, he's pleased to see his niece and Lark's nephew falling in love. But war is raging and the future looks bleak. Can Rollo keep another couple from losing their chance at happiness? *Niven: Actor, Separate Tables (1958); Wright: Supporting Actress, Mrs. Miniver (1942)
November Christmas

Review John Grisham's The Rainmaker (DVD)

Francis Ford Coppola directs and scripts an exciting, star-packed adapta tion of John Grisham's novel about an idealistic young attor ney who tak es on the case of a lifetime. Matt Damon (Good Will Hunting) plays Rudy Baylor, a rookie lawyer in over his head on a hig h-profile case. Opposi ng him: an army of seasoned legal sharks (led by Jon Voight). On Rudy's side: Deck Shifflet (Danny DeVito), a feisty "paralawyer" who specialize s in flunking the bar exam. Rudy's chances are slim to none- until he un covers a trail of corrupti on that might lead to the one thing that coul d win his case: the truth.

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Scrooge (In Color)

Review Snowbound womenfolk wait as three brothers from a farm family go after a killer cat.
White Christmas

Review You never see the title character in William Wellman's Track of the Cat--a black panther terrorizing the land and herd of a frontier family--which is just one of the many bold strokes of this ambitious movie. The intruder claims not merely cattle but also one family member, so middle son (and unquestioned alpha male) Robert Mitchum goes out in the dead of winter to bag the cat. Meanwhile, the tensions inside the ranch house are distilled from Greek tragedy with a large dollop of Freud: harridan mother Beulah Bondi (good performance) wants her sons to remain unmarried, despite the fact that youngest boy Tab Hunter has fallen for a forward lass played by Diana Lynn. Teresa Wright--almost unrecognizable as the spinster sister--speaks for sanity and modern thinking. Track is the second film Wellman made from a novel by Walter Van Tilburg Clark; the first was The Ox-Bow Incident, that equally serious and offbeat Western about lynch violence. For this one, Wellman admitted that one of his motivations was a long-held desire to make a color film that was essentially black-and-white; the snowy backdrops of the exteriors (shot spectacularly around Washington State's Mount Rainier) offered that chance. It's a very exactingly directed movie, both indoors and out, and qualifies as an experiment in mise-en-scene; but experiments in mise-en-scene have rarely translated into box-office success, and Track of the Cat was no exception. One problem: despite Mitchum's robust presence, his solitary journey (which could be covered in interior monologue in a novel) is rather inscrutable. The spiky script is by A.I. Bezzerides, who would do Kiss Me, Deadly a year later. By the way, Wellman later regretted not showing the cat--but he was right the first time. It's an eerie touch in a movie that gets under your skin. --Robert Horton
A Nutcracker Christmas

Review Joseph Cotton star as Uncle Charlie, a calculating and charming killer who hides out in his relatives' small hometown. There, he befriends his favorite niece and namesake, Young Charlie (Teresa Wright). But she begins to suspect he may be the famed Merry Widow murderer. A deadly game of cat and mouse ensues as the psychopathic killer plots the death of his young niece to protect his secret.
The Christmas Note

Review Two generations of lovers struggle to determine whether practicality or passion should guide their fate in this "heartwarming and delightful" (The Hollywood Reporter) tale. Starring Academy AwardÂ(r) winners* David Niven and Teresa Wright and "filmed with tenderness and rhythmic beauty" (Cue), Enchantment casts a captivating spell! As a young man, Rollo (Niven) was kept from his true love, Lark (Wright), by the scheming of his spiteful older sister. Years later, he's pleased to see his niece and Lark's nephew falling in love. But war is raging and the future looks bleak. Can Rollo keep another couple from losing their chance at happiness? *Niven: Actor, Separate Tables (1958); Wright: Supporting Actress, Mrs. Miniver (1942)

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