Sheryl Crow Reviews

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Be Myself

Review Multi-platinum-selling singer, songwriter, and musician Sheryl Crow will release a new album, entitled Be Myself, on April 21st via Warner Bros. Records. Be Myself, her ninth studio album and the first album for the label is available for pre-order now.
For this album, Crow worked again with producer, musician, and songwriter Jeff Trott, a long-time collaborator throughout her career. Trott co-wrote many of Crow's classic hits including "If It Makes You Happy" and "My Favorite Mistake." Crow says her main goal was "to investigate what made my early songs strike people as being authentic and original. So for the first time in my life, I made it a point to sit down and really listen to my old records. I'd drive my kids to school and play the old stuff as I came back home. That helped me remember what it felt like when I was just beginning as an artist. But it wasn't about repeating myself. It was about revisiting where I came from and seeing where that would take me now."
Be Myself is like each of her preceding releases: thoughtful and candid. It's unlike them too, mainly in that it represents contradictory movement -- a look at the world today powered in part by a return to the energy that first lofted Crow and her music into the limelight.
Lindsey Buckingham Christine McVie

Review It took Sheryl years to graduate from session singer to star, but boy did she graduate with honors: a string of Grammys and platinum LPs! 16 hits and favorites from all her albums are here: Leaving Las Vegas; All I Wanna Do; Strong Enough; If It Makes You Happy; Soak Up the Sun; Favorite Mistake; Everyday Is a Winding Road; A Change Would Do You Good; Picture (with Kid Rock); two unissued tracks, and more!
The Search for Everything

Review Despite the photographic presence of an acoustic guitar (the rock & roll equivalent of a rubber bullet), the enviably lovely hair and the unassuming knitwear, Sheryl Crow is staring back at us from the cover of The Very Best Of with her chin resting on a fist clenched tightly with white-knuckled defiance. This is, after all, the girl whose wishful thinking led her to sing "All I wanna do is have some fun" while privately preferring to either curl up in bed for a very long time or roll over and die (she's recently come out of the closet with regards to her longstanding battles with depression).

Yes, she's earned herself an armful of Grammys and has been damned with faint praise, but if you go easy on the relatively troublesome second half of Sheryl Crow's 10-year solo career (the poppy optimism of songs like "C'mon C'mon" and "Soak Up the Sun" seems strained), then this decade-acknowledging resumé serves as a reminder of her narrative talents for summarising the pitfalls of burdensome workloads ("Everyday Is a Winding Road") and problematic squeezes ("My Favorite Mistake") within an MTV-friendly pop framework. --Kevin Maidment
Sad Clowns & Hillbillies

Review CROW SHERYL SHERYL CROW
Feels Like Home

Review Skeptics who attributed the success of Sheryl Crow's 1994 debut, Tuesday Night Music Club, to a combination of Crow's seductive good looks and a shrewd choice of collaborators have been effectively silenced by the range and depth of songs and performances on her self-produced, pointedly self-titled sequel. Playing guitars and keyboards, and building a triumphant, layered vocal style, Crow is tough as nails and drolly soulful on the deft "Change," as noteworthy for Crow's crafty lyrics ("Hello, it's me, I'm not at home/ If you'd like to reach me, leave me alone...") as for its solid, midtempo groove. "Maybe Angels," "If It Makes You Happy," and "Everyday Is a Winding Road" are only the most familiar highlights in a varied and absorbing set that argues Crow is no one's invention but her own. --Sam Sutherland
Pollinator

Review 2013 collection from the Grammy-winning singer/songwriter. From her breakthrough in 1993, Sheryl Crow went on to accumulate a string of hit singles and albums that made her one of the most well-known female artists of recent times. Her irresistible blend of pop, country, soul and folk chimed a resounding chord with the listening public and this collection serves to highlight just what is so great about one of America's most accomplished musical talents. Features 13 of Sheryl's Top 40 UK Chart hits and all four of her Top Ten hits. A perfect walk through her stunning back catalog of repertoire.
The Very Best of Sheryl Crow

Review Nine-time Grammy award-winner Sheryl Crow presents her highly anticipated 2013 album, Feels Like Home, the first country record of her career and features her hit single, "Easy." Each track on the album was co-written with another songwriter, which is a first for Crow, including Grammy award-winner Brad Paisley.

"It wasn't until I moved here that I realized what an amazing community it is, " said Crow of working on Feels Like Home in Nashville, Tenn." It's the thing I've been missing my whole career, the feeling of being able to sit around with a guitar and have people know each other's songs and know songs from people who've influenced all of us. When I moved here pretty early on Vince Gill started calling me to do guitar pulls, and I thought, gosh, this is just like heaven on earth down here. "
Mental Illness

Review During 1987-9 Crow was engaged as a backing singer on Michael Jackson's huge 'Bad' world tour , and worked in a similar capacity for other major artists including George Harrison, Stevie Wonder, Rod Stewart, Bonnie Raitt and Don Henley; the latter claimed she's one of the best female singers there is right now, period, bar none. Sheryl's own recording career faltered slightly, right at the outset. She secured a recording contract with A&M, but at the last minute her proposed 1992 debut was deemed by the label to not fully represent the woman's talents and the release was cancelled after just a handful of promotional cassettes had been issued - which in turn led to the illegitimate distribution of some highly sought-after bootleg CDs. In retrospect, it is clear that A&M made the right decision. Finally released in August 1993, Sheryl's official debut album, Tuesday Night Music Club was an absolute barnstormer which sold more than six million copies in its first year of release. The album spawned two Billboard Top 5 singles in All I Wanna Do and Strong Enough. Live versions of both songs appear in this concert recording, which draws heavily on this exceptional record. Other highlights are a third single, Run Baby Run (which didn't chart but was a radio hit in several countries), Leaving Las Vegas, and the funky The Na Na Song. The sole cover version is Led Zeppelin's idiosyncratic cod-reggae number D'Yer Maker, a version of which Sheryl later contributed to the Atlantic Records' Zep tribute album Encomium (1995). Completing the set this evening are Love Is A Good Thing (which would finally appear almost two years later on Crow's eponymous sophomore album in 1996) and Volvo Cowgirl 99 (actually a speedier variant of The Na Na Song issued as a the B-side to What I Can Do For You in 1993).
Turn Up The Quiet

Review Sheryl Crow's first studio album in four years shows a woman if not on the verge of a nervous breakdown, then one who has gone a little off the rails and is in the process of pulling herself back on track again. For her past three studio albums, Crow has been known as the quintessential party girl who liked a beer buzz in the morning, but C'mon, C'mon shows her to be much more than that. Breakup, illness, and loss have tempered her good-time persona, and like other life-altering events, both her character and lyrics are stronger for it. This latest offering might not break any new musical ground--again relying on her retooling of '70s country rock--but she displays an honesty and naked vulnerability not witnessed in her earlier work, honing her pain to a fine, lyrical edge. The brooding "Weather Channel" shows a rawboned Crow unafraid to display her emotional bruising, but without losing any of her sly wit: "Just a pill to make me happy / I know it may not fix the hinges, but at least the door has stopped its creaking." Besides songs reflecting her newfound poignancy are a couple of swaggering rockers that recall middle-period Stones, including "You're an Original," featuring Lenny Kravitz, the whimsical and insouciant "Steve McQueen," which finds Crow boasting "I ain't taking shit off of no one," and the deceptively frothy "Soak Up the Sun," which features the long missing-in-action Liz Phair on background vocals. In addition to resurrecting Phair, Crow also has compiled a paparazzo's dream, soliciting the vocal talents of pals Stevie Nicks, Natalie Maines , Emmylou Harris, Don Henley, and inexplicably, the actress Gwyneth Paltrow. --Jaan Uhelszki
Hopeless Romantic

Review Sheryl Crow's first studio album in four years shows a woman if not on the verge of a nervous breakdown, then one who has gone a little off the rails and is in the process of pulling herself back on track again. For her past three studio albums, Crow has been known as the quintessential party girl who liked a beer buzz in the morning, but C'mon, C'mon shows her to be much more than that. Breakup, illness, and loss have tempered her good-time persona, and like other life-altering events, both her character and lyrics are stronger for it. This latest offering might not break any new musical ground--again relying on her retooling of '70s country rock--but she displays an honesty and naked vulnerability not witnessed in her earlier work, honing her pain to a fine, lyrical edge. The brooding "Weather Channel" shows a rawboned Crow unafraid to display her emotional bruising, but without losing any of her sly wit: "Just a pill to make me happy / I know it may not fix the hinges, but at least the door has stopped its creaking." Besides songs reflecting her newfound poignancy are a couple of swaggering rockers that recall middle-period Stones, including "You're an Original," featuring Lenny Kravitz, the whimsical and insouciant "Steve McQueen," which finds Crow boasting "I ain't taking shit off of no one," and the deceptively frothy "Soak Up the Sun," which features the long missing-in-action Liz Phair on background vocals. In addition to resurrecting Phair, Crow also has compiled a paparazzo's dream, soliciting the vocal talents of pals Stevie Nicks, Natalie Maines , Emmylou Harris, Don Henley, and inexplicably, the actress Gwyneth Paltrow. --Jaan Uhelszki
TajMo

Review Amazon.com For some fairly shallow performers, there comes a time when their craft becomes a chore, when scribbling songs for the big follow-up album turns into a black-and-white deadline. Clever composers can almost disguise this ennui, burying it in a smarmy, sunshine-beaming mix. Key word: almost. Ergo, a trial spin through clever composer Sheryl Crow's The Globe Sessions evokes the faintest hint of a feeling that grows stronger with each successive listening--there's no sense that the artist intended this material as anything more than tepid album filler. A conversation with your local supermarket checkout girl would prove far more riveting than Crow's pretentious and all-too-casual observations (set to the tune, it must be noted, of some likable, jangly hooks). "Get out the camera, take a picture / The drag queens and the freaks are all out on the town," she purrs over chucka-chucka choogling on "There Goes the Neighborhood," which is probably what any self-respecting drag queen or freak would mutter once Crow moved in, scrounging for her now-patented vicarious cool. The closest The Globe Sessions comes to any palpable sincerity is during an actually-might've-lived-it, whoops-I'm-in-trouble-again "Mississippi." Even then, Crow drowns the moment in perfectly enunciated syllables, more prissy than alleycat-prowling. Crow started out with a credible Tuesday Night Music Club pedigree, surrounded by visionaries such as David Baerwald (For this disc, she relies heavily on ex-Wire Train mainstay Jeff Trott). But they're gone, and things change, to the point where, if you support this silly sycophant with your hard-earned dollars, there's only one question that you'll need to be asked: Do you want paper or plastic
The Very Best of Sheryl Crow

Review For some fairly shallow performers, there comes a time when their craft becomes a chore, when scribbling songs for the big follow-up album turns into a black-and-white deadline. Clever composers can almost disguise this ennui, burying it in a smarmy, sunshine-beaming mix. Key word: almost. Ergo, a trial spin through clever composer Sheryl Crow's The Globe Sessions evokes the faintest hint of a feeling that grows stronger with each successive listening--there's no sense that the artist intended this material as anything more than tepid album filler. A conversation with your local supermarket checkout girl would prove far more riveting than Crow's pretentious and all-too-casual observations (set to the tune, it must be noted, of some likable, jangly hooks). "Get out the camera, take a picture / The drag queens and the freaks are all out on the town," she purrs over chucka-chucka choogling on "There Goes the Neighborhood," which is probably what any self-respecting drag queen or freak would mutter once Crow moved in, scrounging for her now-patented vicarious cool. The closest The Globe Sessions comes to any palpable sincerity is during an actually-might've-lived-it, whoops-I'm-in-trouble-again "Mississippi." Even then, Crow drowns the moment in perfectly enunciated syllables, more prissy than alleycat-prowling. Crow started out with a credible Tuesday Night Music Club pedigree, surrounded by visionaries such as David Baerwald (For this disc, she relies heavily on ex-Wire Train mainstay Jeff Trott). But they're gone, and things change, to the point where, if you support this silly sycophant with your hard-earned dollars, there's only one question that you'll need to be asked: Do you want paper or plastic? --Tom Lanham
The Collection

Review The two new tracks are: 1. Always on Your Side (duet with Sting) replacing the original track. 2. I Know Why new added cut (country version)
Be Myself

Review Since her 1993 debut, Tuesday Night Music Club, Sheryl Crow has been churning out unassailably appealing CDs in an unassailably appealing voice. Which means, according to the rules of the pop music cosmos, by album six it's about time for a misstep. Natural law, fortunately, will have to keep checking its watch. Wildflower moves Sheryl Crow one step closer to Hall of Fame status as she shunts the established rock star's impulse to get all experimental, but instead sprawls, rambling rose-like, across the substance-spiked pop landscape she helped pioneer. Three ingredients, glistening vocals, flawless production, and catchy songs rub up against one another in all the right places. These ingredients will cause you to hold your breath on the beautiful piano ballad "Always on Your Side." They pop up again on the George Harrison-esque "Where Has All the Love Gone" reminding you that Crow can reflect and reveal as convincingly as she can rock. If there is a ripple that runs through Wildflower, it's a pensive one. On the spacy "Chances Are," she sings of being "...lost inside a daydream." The measure of her talent, ripe and reappraisal-resistant, is her ability to consistently bring us inside the bubble with her. --Tammy La Gorce

Recommended Sheryl Crow Discography


Tuesday Night Music Club

Sheryl Crow

C’mon C’mon


Sheryl Crow

Review For Sheryl Crow, the title of her seventh album isn't just a location; it's a state of mind. So for the Kennett, Missouri native, calling the disc 100 Miles From Memphis is a statement of purpose, both musical and emotional. It also marks a long-awaited return by the nine-time Grammy winner to the sounds that first drew her to making music. The results evoke a time when soul and passion filled the radio waves, when the sweat and joy of a recording session could be captured forever on wax. Sometimes the musical references--Al Green, Sly and the Family Stone, Stevie Wonder--are made apparent, but the album's 11 songs are characterized more by capturing a classic spirit than by imitating any specific style. Features guest appearances from Keith Richards, Justin Timberlake and Citizen Cope.
Jagged Little Pill

Review Multi-platinum-selling singer, songwriter, and musician Sheryl Crow will release a new album, entitled Be Myself, on April 21st via Warner Bros. Records. Be Myself, her ninth studio album and the first album for the label is available for pre-order now.
For this album, Crow worked again with producer, musician, and songwriter Jeff Trott, a long-time collaborator throughout her career. Trott co-wrote many of Crow's classic hits including "If It Makes You Happy" and "My Favorite Mistake." Crow says her main goal was "to investigate what made my early songs strike people as being authentic and original. So for the first time in my life, I made it a point to sit down and really listen to my old records. I'd drive my kids to school and play the old stuff as I came back home. That helped me remember what it felt like when I was just beginning as an artist. But it wasn't about repeating myself. It was about revisiting where I came from and seeing where that would take me now."
Be Myself is like each of her preceding releases: thoughtful and candid. It's unlike them too, mainly in that it represents contradictory movement -- a look at the world today powered in part by a return to the energy that first lofted Crow and her music into the limelight.
Everyday Is A Winding Road: The Collection - Sheryl Crow

Review It took Sheryl years to graduate from session singer to star, but boy did she graduate with honors: a string of Grammys and platinum LPs! 16 hits and favorites from all her albums are here: Leaving Las Vegas; All I Wanna Do; Strong Enough; If It Makes You Happy; Soak Up the Sun; Favorite Mistake; Everyday Is a Winding Road; A Change Would Do You Good; Picture (with Kid Rock); two unissued tracks, and more!
Tuesday Night Music Club

Review Despite the photographic presence of an acoustic guitar (the rock & roll equivalent of a rubber bullet), the enviably lovely hair and the unassuming knitwear, Sheryl Crow is staring back at us from the cover of The Very Best Of with her chin resting on a fist clenched tightly with white-knuckled defiance. This is, after all, the girl whose wishful thinking led her to sing "All I wanna do is have some fun" while privately preferring to either curl up in bed for a very long time or roll over and die (she's recently come out of the closet with regards to her longstanding battles with depression).

Yes, she's earned herself an armful of Grammys and has been damned with faint praise, but if you go easy on the relatively troublesome second half of Sheryl Crow's 10-year solo career (the poppy optimism of songs like "C'mon C'mon" and "Soak Up the Sun" seems strained), then this decade-acknowledging resumé serves as a reminder of her narrative talents for summarising the pitfalls of burdensome workloads ("Everyday Is a Winding Road") and problematic squeezes ("My Favorite Mistake") within an MTV-friendly pop framework. --Kevin Maidment
Feels Like Home

Review CROW SHERYL SHERYL CROW
The Best of Bonnie Raitt

Review Skeptics who attributed the success of Sheryl Crow's 1994 debut, Tuesday Night Music Club, to a combination of Crow's seductive good looks and a shrewd choice of collaborators have been effectively silenced by the range and depth of songs and performances on her self-produced, pointedly self-titled sequel. Playing guitars and keyboards, and building a triumphant, layered vocal style, Crow is tough as nails and drolly soulful on the deft "Change," as noteworthy for Crow's crafty lyrics ("Hello, it's me, I'm not at home/ If you'd like to reach me, leave me alone...") as for its solid, midtempo groove. "Maybe Angels," "If It Makes You Happy," and "Everyday Is a Winding Road" are only the most familiar highlights in a varied and absorbing set that argues Crow is no one's invention but her own. --Sam Sutherland

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