Missy Elliott Reviews

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Original Album Series - Missy Elliott

Review 5 CD set. Collects five of her original albums, in card LP replica sleeves! Features "Supa Dupa Fly" (1997), "Da Real World" (1999), "Miss E... So Addictive" (2001), "Under Construction" (2002) and "This Is Not a Test!" (2003).
Respect M.E.

Review 2009 collection from the Soul/Hip Hop singer, songwriter and producer. Missy's first major success came as a songwriter with childhood friend and producer Timbaland on projects for Aaliyah, 702, Total, and SWV. As a record producer and songwriter, she has worked with Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, and Janet Jackson, as well as contemporary artists Keyshia Cole, G Dragon, Tamia, Monica and Ciara. This compilation focuses on her solo hits and includes 'Get Ur Freak On,' 'Work It,', 'I'm Really Hot (Respect M.E.),' '4 My People' (Basement Jaxx Remix/Radio Edit), 'Lose Control' (featuring Ciara and Fat Man Scoop) and many more.
The Cookbook

Review Parental Advisory - Explicit Content

Certified platinum by the RIAA (9/97).


My Life

Review Gettin' by with a little help from her friends, you have to know that Missy Elliot means business when her CD starts out with an intro by rap's reigning jester, Busta Rhymes ("Busta's Intro"). From there on, Elliot's soulful vocals and clever raps would serve to be strong enough on its own, but the whole disc becomes a superpowered collective when a host of celebrities contribute on nearly every song. There's the built-for-cruising grooves of "Sock It 2 Me" featuring Da Brat on trademark lightening-fast rhymes, the sultry Ginuwine-marked "Friendly Skies" and "Best Friends" with Aaliyah. Supa Dupa Fly is a disc filled with woman-empowering lyrics and philosophies, but those looking for a role models for young children should be forewarned; some rough language is mixed in with the disc's good intentions. --Denise Sheppard
Stankonia

Review 2LP set. Reissued in 2017! Debut 1997 album includes "The Rain (Supa Dupa Fly)" and "Hit 'Em wit da Hee". Cameos by Busta Rhymes, Ginuwine, Queen Latifah, Lil' Kim, Aaliyah and others.
What's The 411?

Review With three groundbreaking platinum-plus albums, Missy "Misdemeanor" Elliott is one of the most recognized artists in the world, a true icon of pop and hip hop music and culture. Her yet-to-be-titled new album is one of the most anticipated albums of 2002, and will no doubt make her an even bigger multimedia superstar that this artist, producer, writer and businesswoman already is. The album is off to a great start with the first single "Work It," the most explosive single of her career, an anthem after only two weeks at radio. The album also features a great line-up of guests, including Jay-Z, Ludacris, Beyonce Knowles, TLC and Method Man.
The Miseducation Of Lauryn Hill

Review Attention B-girls and boys: Missy Elliott is officially over it. Like her homegirl Mary J. Blige, the rap diva declares, "no more drama." Time to get back to the essence. To that end, Under Construction bubbles over with a combination of ridiculously slamming beats and clever old-school references--not to mention a slew of guest stars. Based on the rhyme schematic from UTFO’s "Roxanne Roxanne" and featuring Ms. Jade’s tight-laced drawl, "Funky Fresh Dressed" draws on several classics, including the Beasties' "Paul Revere." Missy croons and Jay-Z namedrops his way through the loose-limbed "Back in the Day." Ludacris injects some new jack Southern flavor into the sinuous anti-hater’s anthem, "Gossip Folks." "Work It" features a catchy chorus and an absolutely insane Timbaland track. As is to be expected, Aaliyah’s presence looms large over the proceedings, especially on the classic Misdemeanor-style hip-hop and R&B hybrid, "Nothing out There for Me." Missy’s rap adlibs play second fiddle to the song’s lush vocals, as Beyoncé fills the diva role previously occupied by the late, great Aaliyah. --Rebecca Levine
Hardcore

Review Missy "Misdeameanor" Elliott's first two groundbreaking albums, the double platinum debut Supa Dupa Fly and platinum follow-up Da Real World made her one of the most influential icons of Pop and Hip Hop culture. Her new album, Miss E...So Addictive, is one of the most anticipated albums of 2001, and will undeniably make her an even bigger multimedia superstar than this producer, writer and businesswoman already is. The album features appearances by, among others, Jay-Z, Method Man, Eve, Busta Rhymes, and Ludacris, and was produced by Missy and Timbaland. Certified Platinum by the RIAA. (7/01)
4:44

Review After a long winter of discontent, So Addictive finds Missy Elliott hoping to initiate hip-hop's summer of love. Miss E's third album is dosed with feel-good flavor and has more guests than the VIP section of the hippest hip-hop hot spot. Buddies Method Man and Redman bark across the bridge of "Dog in Heat"'s canine funk. Jay-Z and Ludacris feature on two different versions of "One Minute Man"'s scathing soul. Synths tweak and creak in rhythm as Missy unleashes a dreamy diss of those hopeless suitors who unload their cargo before they've sparked her ignition. "Take Away" features Pony man Ginuwine on a hypnotic slow-burner heavily reminiscent of Art of Noise's "Moments in Love." When left to her own devices, as she is on "Lick Shots" (which jangles like Django Reinhardt on downers), Missy comes on like Schooly D, a fearless, female gangsta licking shots against anyone who dares cross her. On "Scream a.k.a. Itchin'" she breaks into a soprano. A 4/4 stomp is stamped indelibly across the ecstasy-holler song "4 My People" (featuring Eve). Overall, it feels as if producer Timbaland has muted his experimental leanings on this outing with his favorite muse in favor of submersible club tracks. Musically, the bhangra beat bop of "Get Ur Freak On" is the standout. The spiral timing of "Whatcha Gon' Do," the fret-skipping "Slap! Slap Slap!" (featuring Da Brat), and the sunken, drunken funk of the not-so-subtle X-hex "X-Tasy" are tied at a close second. --Chris Campion
Get Rich Or Die Tryin'

Review Supa Dupa Fly, made her one of the most influential icons of hip-hop culture. Inarguably one of the most anticipated albums of '99, Da Real World (produced by studio wizard Timbaland) is a funky slow ride one minute, a simmering cauldron of cranked-up rhythms and underground beats the next. The album's blue ribbon guest list includes Redman, Eminem, Juvenile, Aaliyah, Da Brat and Big Boi (Outkast) among others. [Note: This product is an authorized, licensed CD-R and is manufactured on demand]
Strength Of A Woman

Review Throughout the entirety of Da Real World, Missy Elliott is determined to redefine the meaning of the negative, female-targeted b-word (the album was originally going to be titled She's a Bitch). Inverting the term to represent a woman who knows what she wants, Missy exhibits her new attitude by aggressively showcasing her strong songwriting skills and superb vocal talents. Her lyrics are relatively simple, but perfectly complement the syncopated orchestrations of the often-imitated, never-duplicated producer Timbaland. Climactic strings dance around the voices of Missy, Nicole, and Outkast's Big Boi on "All N My Grill" and on "Busa Rhyme" a punctuating tone accentuates the dark confessions of featured MC Eminem. A plethora of guests pepper Da Real World, but the multifaceted Missy is never outshone. --Celine Wong
Respect M.E.

Review Missy's back with her 6th album The Cookbook. The first single, 'Lose Control' features R&B princess Ciara and hip-hop motivator Fat Man Scoop. Album also features additional production by long time friend and collaborator Timbaland and The Neptunes. Special guests include Tweet, Fantasia, Slick Rick, Mike Jones, Mary J Blige, Grand Puba and Lil Kim. Atlantic. 2005.
Original Album Series - Missy Elliott

Review With The Cookbook, the innovative Missy Elliott proves to the masses she is a musical mad scientist whose artistic abilities are unparalleled and without peer. Elliott is a quadruple threat: rapper, singer, songwriter and producer; add that to her woman-empowered lyrics and Missy's ability to be a musical and mental role model is inarguable. As a producer, Missy Elliott knows how to build a great project by incorporating the best talent available, an easy task since so many want to work with her. Not surprisingly, The Cookbook is filled with a world-class guest list. That very large list includes American Idol winner Fantasia , cRunk&B queen Ciara , old-school rapper Slick Rick , dancehall sensation M.I.A. (on the drumline-heavy "Bad Man") and the current queen of soul, Mary J. Blige . In a reversal of roles, "My Struggles" finds Missy singing "Ya'll don't really know my life, y'all don't really know my struggles" while Mary J. raps over a sample of herself from "What's The 411." One unexpected surprise is Missy sings out more than on previous releases. The bare-bones "Remember When" is a definite standout, a 70's-inspired slow jam highlighted by her honest lyrics, sweet falsetto and jazz-affected tones. The beautiful melancholy of "Teary Eyed" is another standout, an amen-inducing testament to a relationship gone wrong and the beginning of the healing process. To hear Missy sing with full rawness and no bravado is a further testament to her talents and will likely bring an even larger audience into her fold. -- Denise Sheppard
Miss Eso Addictive

Review 2016 vinyl edition of the 2015 banger featuring Pharrell Williams. Four mixes.
The Cookbook

Review ELLIOTT MISSY THIS IS NOT A TEST
Under Construction

Review There's a reason rap enthusiasts breathlessly await new Missy albums. Maybe it's because her work is so uninhibited--who else but Missy would marvel at the magic of, er, self-love gadgets like she does on "Toyz"? And tastefully too! Perhaps most A-list rap stars don't need sexual aids to get their groove on, but Missy's looking out for the 95 percent of the female rap population who might not look like Halle Berry. Some would apologetically rock fake hair extensions, but Missy celebrates them on "Let Me Fix My Weave." The self-deprecation continues on the jazzy "I'm Not Perfect." But This Is Not a Test is not all about Miss E. With her beat-wizard buddy Timbaland, she's on a crusade to revitalize what they feel is a stagnating commercial rap marketplace. It reaches its apex on "Wake Up" (featuring Jay-Z), where she reminds us that wearing big Liberace chains and driving high-end sport utility vehicles is not all that important. Sure, most of the guest collaborations here either sound unpolished or unnecessary, but, like Bahamadia, Missy's one of the few modern-day femcees who would rather push envelopes than lick 'em. Despite its title, this album does test rap's experimental boundaries with much success. --Dalton Higgins
20th Century Masters: The Best Of Salt-N-Pepa [Jewel]

Review 5 CD set. Collects five of her original albums, in card LP replica sleeves! Features "Supa Dupa Fly" (1997), "Da Real World" (1999), "Miss E... So Addictive" (2001), "Under Construction" (2002) and "This Is Not a Test!" (2003).
Supa Dupa Fly

Review 2009 collection from the Soul/Hip Hop singer, songwriter and producer. Missy's first major success came as a songwriter with childhood friend and producer Timbaland on projects for Aaliyah, 702, Total, and SWV. As a record producer and songwriter, she has worked with Whitney Houston, Mariah Carey, and Janet Jackson, as well as contemporary artists Keyshia Cole, G Dragon, Tamia, Monica and Ciara. This compilation focuses on her solo hits and includes 'Get Ur Freak On,' 'Work It,', 'I'm Really Hot (Respect M.E.),' '4 My People' (Basement Jaxx Remix/Radio Edit), 'Lose Control' (featuring Ciara and Fat Man Scoop) and many more.
Greatest Hits

Review Parental Advisory - Explicit Content

Certified platinum by the RIAA (9/97).


The Best Of DMX

Review Gettin' by with a little help from her friends, you have to know that Missy Elliot means business when her CD starts out with an intro by rap's reigning jester, Busta Rhymes ("Busta's Intro"). From there on, Elliot's soulful vocals and clever raps would serve to be strong enough on its own, but the whole disc becomes a superpowered collective when a host of celebrities contribute on nearly every song. There's the built-for-cruising grooves of "Sock It 2 Me" featuring Da Brat on trademark lightening-fast rhymes, the sultry Ginuwine-marked "Friendly Skies" and "Best Friends" with Aaliyah. Supa Dupa Fly is a disc filled with woman-empowering lyrics and philosophies, but those looking for a role models for young children should be forewarned; some rough language is mixed in with the disc's good intentions. --Denise Sheppard

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