Merian C. Cooper Reviews

Reviews - Actor or Actress or Director or Movie | Brand or Product | Author or Title | Artist or Album
Keyword(s)
Category
Location US UK DE

Grass

Review The lost masterpiece by the makers of "King Kong," Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack's "Chang" is available for the first time in over 45 years. Shot entirely in Siam, the film tells the story of a farmer and his family who have settled a small patch of land on the edge of the jungle. Their existence is a constant struggle against the many wild animals around them--bears, tigers, leopards, and even...changs! The climactic elephant stampede is still one of the most exciting scenes in cinema history.
Chang

Review Before creating their grand fantasy King Kong, Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack took their cameras to Siam to put genuine wild jungle creatures on the screen in their part-adventure, part-documentary spectacle Chang. It was a smash hit upon its 1927 release and is still considered a classic of the genre, filled with sights that retain their power 70 years later. A loose story is constructed around the lives of a family living at the edge of the jungle in a hut raised high up on stilts. The father tracks the leopards killing his livestock while the children play with a veritable petting zoo of furry little pups and cubs. The filmmakers are at times condescending toward their tribal heroes ("We be mighty hunters, Kru," comments one warrior in an intertitle, as if their own language is but some pidgin dialect) and fill the film with goofy comic relief. Just forget the story and enjoy the sights: hunters building deadfalls and spring traps, a leopard charging through the woods, and the climactic elephant stampede. The images of the awesome beasts fording a river like a rampaging army while the villagers struggle to split the herd and save their village is astounding. The silent film is set to an original score by Bangkok composer Bruce Gaston and performed by the traditional Thailand orchestra Fong Naam.

The beautifully mastered DVD also features commentary by historian Rudy Behlmer, a color test for the film, a production essay, and a reproduction of the original press kit. --Sean Axmaker


The Last Days Of Pompeii

Review No Description Available.
Genre: Feature Film-Drama
Rating: NR
Release Date: 22-NOV-2005
Media Type: DVD
Quo Vadis (1951)

Review Fresh off their monumental success with King Kong, producer Merian Cooper and director Ernest Schoedsack teamed again on The Last Days of Pompeii, another big-scale offering with a special-effects emphasis. Nominally based on the Bulwer-Lytton book, the film invents a new storyline much in the spirit of the Cecil B. DeMille religioso-melodrama school. Preston Foster plays a pacifist blacksmith whose life is ruined by fate; he turns his fighting skills to the gladiatorial arena and raises a foster son. A cameo appearance by Jesus Christ affects the boy but not the man, and it all comes a-cropper years later when Mount Vesuvius gets restless outside Pompeii's city limits. Fond childhood memories of the volcano's eruption should be tempered by the fact that the effects (designed by Kong man Willis O'Brien) are limited to the final 20 minutes of the film, and that the preceding 75 minutes are a slow ride indeed. This film's creakiness makes you appreciate how good DeMille was at whipping up entertainment out of historical yarns. One definite bright spot: Basil Rathbone, bringing his equine deliberation to the role of Pontius Pilate. --Robert Horton
The Sea Hawk

Review Brand Name: EMPHASIS ENTERTAINMENT GROUP Mfg#: 617311677496, Shipping Weight: 1.00 lbs, Manufacturer: EMPHASIS ENTERTAINMENT GROUP, Genre: Documentary, All music products are properly licensed and guaranteed authentic.
Queen of the Nile

Review Katharine Hepburn portrayed everything from queens to a Chinese peasant in her splendid career, but her most unusual role may just be Trigger Hicks in Spitfire. The elegant, cultured Hepburn plays an ornery, rock-chuckin' mountain gal who finds God - and a knack for faith healing - in a pack of stolen Bible cards. But when she exercises her self-declared miraculous powers on a sick baby, the local folks figure Trigger is a force of supernatural evil. Two fine leading men, Robert Young and Ralph Bellamy, lend skilled support in a picture that's Hepburn's all the way: "After the story of Spitfire is forgotten, memories of Miss Hepburn's performance will remain" (The Times (London)).

When sold by Amazon.com, this product will be manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.


When Worlds Collide

Review The lost masterpiece by the makers of "King Kong," Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack's "Chang" is available for the first time in over 45 years. Shot entirely in Siam, the film tells the story of a farmer and his family who have settled a small patch of land on the edge of the jungle. Their existence is a constant struggle against the many wild animals around them--bears, tigers, leopards, and even...changs! The climactic elephant stampede is still one of the most exciting scenes in cinema history.
The Giant Behemoth

Review Before creating their grand fantasy King Kong, Merian C. Cooper and Ernest B. Schoedsack took their cameras to Siam to put genuine wild jungle creatures on the screen in their part-adventure, part-documentary spectacle Chang. It was a smash hit upon its 1927 release and is still considered a classic of the genre, filled with sights that retain their power 70 years later. A loose story is constructed around the lives of a family living at the edge of the jungle in a hut raised high up on stilts. The father tracks the leopards killing his livestock while the children play with a veritable petting zoo of furry little pups and cubs. The filmmakers are at times condescending toward their tribal heroes ("We be mighty hunters, Kru," comments one warrior in an intertitle, as if their own language is but some pidgin dialect) and fill the film with goofy comic relief. Just forget the story and enjoy the sights: hunters building deadfalls and spring traps, a leopard charging through the woods, and the climactic elephant stampede. The images of the awesome beasts fording a river like a rampaging army while the villagers struggle to split the herd and save their village is astounding. The silent film is set to an original score by Bangkok composer Bruce Gaston and performed by the traditional Thailand orchestra Fong Naam.

The beautifully mastered DVD also features commentary by historian Rudy Behlmer, a color test for the film, a production essay, and a reproduction of the original press kit. --Sean Axmaker


The Invisible Man

Review No Description Available.
Genre: Feature Film-Drama
Rating: NR
Release Date: 22-NOV-2005
Media Type: DVD
The Mark Of Zorro

Review Fresh off their monumental success with King Kong, producer Merian Cooper and director Ernest Schoedsack teamed again on The Last Days of Pompeii, another big-scale offering with a special-effects emphasis. Nominally based on the Bulwer-Lytton book, the film invents a new storyline much in the spirit of the Cecil B. DeMille religioso-melodrama school. Preston Foster plays a pacifist blacksmith whose life is ruined by fate; he turns his fighting skills to the gladiatorial arena and raises a foster son. A cameo appearance by Jesus Christ affects the boy but not the man, and it all comes a-cropper years later when Mount Vesuvius gets restless outside Pompeii's city limits. Fond childhood memories of the volcano's eruption should be tempered by the fact that the effects (designed by Kong man Willis O'Brien) are limited to the final 20 minutes of the film, and that the preceding 75 minutes are a slow ride indeed. This film's creakiness makes you appreciate how good DeMille was at whipping up entertainment out of historical yarns. One definite bright spot: Basil Rathbone, bringing his equine deliberation to the role of Pontius Pilate. --Robert Horton
The Atlantis Lost Continent

Review Brand Name: EMPHASIS ENTERTAINMENT GROUP Mfg#: 617311677496, Shipping Weight: 1.00 lbs, Manufacturer: EMPHASIS ENTERTAINMENT GROUP, Genre: Documentary, All music products are properly licensed and guaranteed authentic.
Captain Blood

Review Katharine Hepburn portrayed everything from queens to a Chinese peasant in her splendid career, but her most unusual role may just be Trigger Hicks in Spitfire. The elegant, cultured Hepburn plays an ornery, rock-chuckin' mountain gal who finds God - and a knack for faith healing - in a pack of stolen Bible cards. But when she exercises her self-declared miraculous powers on a sick baby, the local folks figure Trigger is a force of supernatural evil. Two fine leading men, Robert Young and Ralph Bellamy, lend skilled support in a picture that's Hepburn's all the way: "After the story of Spitfire is forgotten, memories of Miss Hepburn's performance will remain" (The Times (London)).

When sold by Amazon.com, this product will be manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.



Reviews         Home