Los Lobos Reviews

Reviews - Actor or Actress or Director or Movie | Brand or Product | Author or Title | Artist or Album
Keyword(s)
Category
Location US UK DE

Gates Of Gold

Review With Gates of Gold, LOS LOBOS bring their powerhouse mix of Rock, Tex-Mex, Country, Folk, and Blues. From start to finish, the lyrics and mood evoke a rich American saga in the tradition of Faulkner and Steinbeck from this truly original multi- Grammy award winning band from East LA on their first studio album in five years.
Lost Time

Review This triple-Grammy winning group of consummate musicians and songwriters out of East L.A. began their career interpreting Mexican folk music and went on to be a globally renowned purvayor of a diverse and adventurous repertoire of roots-flavored masterpieces. Drawing from rock, country, blues, folk, R&B, Americana, and traditional Spanish and Latin American idioms, Los Lobos continually pushed the boundaries of their sound, while remaining magnificently gritty and graceful throughout. Warner. 2006.
Kiko (20Th Anniversary Edition)

Review Wonderful 1984 album from East LA legends, co-produced by T-Bone Burnett. Includes 'Don't Worry Baby'.
Tin Can Trust

Review Los Lobos's ability to wade through disparate musical styles isn't the stuff of Elvis and the Beatles, but Los Lobos did it on their debut album. And, unlike much of the material Los Lobos cut their teeth on as a Los Angeles Top 40 cover band, there is nothing lowest-common-denominator about the band's original music. "Don't Worry Baby" is a blues rocker gritty enough for John Lee Hooker; rockabilly meets country, courtesy of David Hidalgo's lap steel, on "Our Last Night"; Cesar Rosas pays homage to the band's Mexican roots on the mariachi-style "Corrido #1"; and "Will the Wolf Survive?" is an infectious jangle rocker that became an early MTV hit. Seamless. File under American Music. --Bill Crandall
How Will The Wolf Survive

Review Los Lobos is celebrating the 20th anniversary of their seminal album Kiko with the release of Kiko 20th Anniversary Edition on CD. The Kiko 20th Anniversary Edition is newly remastered, and features bonus material including demo versions of album tracks and live recordings, and new liner notes written by Los Angeles journalist and longtime friend of the band, Luis Torres.

Released in 1992, Kiko was embraced by fans and hailed by critics as the band s defining moment, the album that put Los Lobos back on the innovation track. Kiko was produced by Mitchell Froom, who received a Grammy nomination for Producer of the Year for his work on the album, and who had previously collaborated with the band on La Bamba. Dubbed one of the albums of the decade by The Wall Street Journal, "the album of the year" by the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune, and one of "The Essential Recordings of the '90s" by Rolling Stone, Los Lobos also took home an MTV Music Video Award for Breakthrough Video for "Kiko and the Lavender Moon" in 1993.
Wolf Tracks: Best of Los Lobos

Review Just Another Band From East L.A.: A Collection by Los Lobos

When sold by Amazon.com, this product will be manufactured on demand using CD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.


Disconnected In New York City

Review Even the title of this terrific two-disc compilation--a play on the title of an early-'70s recording by Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention--displays just how clever and hip this great L.A. band has always been. Just Another Band is everything an anthology should be, touching on all the best-known moments ("Don't Worry Baby," "Will the Wolf Survive?," "One Time One Night," "La Bamba," etc.), spanning their career from its origins through Kiko (six tracks from which are featured here), arguably their finest hour. Musically, you get hard R&B, Tex-Mex, pure traditional Mexican music, pop-rock, gorgeous ballads, and pure, raucous rock & roll. Actually, pure is the operative word here--and fans who already own all the albums proper will probably still want this for the soundtrack cuts, live versions (including a performance of their great "Let's Say Goodnight"), unreleased outtakes, cool live cover versions (from both Marvin Gaye and Cream!), and even their terrific "I Wanna Be Like You (The Monkey Song)," originally performed by Louis Prima in The Jungle Book, from the late-1980s, Hal Wilner-produced Disney tribute, Stay Awake. How will the wolves survive? Damn well, from every indication on this fine collection. --Bill Holdship
The Ghosts of Highway 20

Review Collection of live tracks assembled by Los Lobos member Cesar Rosas. This is the second volume in a continuing series of limited releases issued by the band. This release contains live cuts recorded by the band in 1997. Los Lobos is a multiple Grammy Awardwinning rock band from East Los Angeles, California. Their music is influenced by rock n roll, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues, brown-eyed soul, and traditional music such as cumbia, boleros and norteños. They gained international stardom in 1987 when their cover version of Ritchie Valens' "La Bamba" (from the film of the same name) topped the charts in the US, the UK and in several other countries.
Let Me Get By [2 CD][Deluxe Edition]

Review CD reissue. This fantastic live album from the Latino Rockers from Los Angeles was only available at Los Lobos shows on their December 2007 tour and through the band's web site. Blending the blues, rockabilly, jazz, Latin and their own Mexican-American heritage, Los Lobos subtly challenge listeners with conscience-raising songs and thought-provoking lyrics. Features 11 tracks including 'Colossal Head', 'Revolution' and Don't Worry Baby'. Los Lobos Records.
Panhandle Rambler

Review The CD and digital version of this release was last released by Hollywood Records in 2000. Long before they became American rock legends and Grammy favorites, Los Lobos (or rather Los Lobos del Este de Los Angeles--the Wolves of East Los Angeles--as they were then known) turned a faithful musical tutelage by their parents' Mexican folk music records into a steady stream of gigs at parties, weddings, and what was then a career plateau--a regular engagement at a Mexican restaurant. They also invested in this long out-of-print 1978 independent recording of the best of their all-acoustic traditional Mexican repertoire of that time. Perhaps prophetic of the fusion to come, they named themselves after a popular Tex-Mex group, Los Lobos del Norte, but titled the LP in a good-natured nod to Frank Zappa. Though light years from the experimentation of Kiko and Colossal Head, this collection nonetheless exudes a dedication, soul, and sheer musicality that will be instantly familiar to Lobos admirers. Especially in tackling chestnuts such as "Cielito Lindo" (here quickly segueing from typically sloppy party favorite into a fresh, intricate arrangement in a heartbeat) and "Guantanamera" (in a traditional, rhythmically compelling guajira), the Lobos can't resist some loving musical tweaking. More than just the roots of a modern legend, this is truly music from the heart. --Jerry McCulley
One Time One Night: Live Recordings 1

Review After hitting a creative peak in the early '90s, Los Lobos settled into a decade-long groove that was perhaps a little too comfortable. The band's twelfth studio CD, The Ride, tries to shake things up a bit, and mostly succeeds by pairing the group with a string of collaborators similar to Carlos Santana's Supernatural. Only instead of the young hit-makers that propelled Santana's comeback, The Ride matches Los Lobos with early influences (Bobby Womack, Little Willie G) and long-time friends (Dave Alvin, Elvis Costello).

The experimentalism that fueled 1992's Kiko can be found here on a couple of tracks--most notably "Kitate," a deliriously wiggy collaboration with Tom Waits and Martha Gonzales of Quetzal--but generally the focus is on blues, soul, and roots rock. Surprisingly, some of the strongest performances are new versions of songs previously recorded by Lobos: Costello helps the band re-invent "Matter of Time" as a piano and pedal-steel guitar ballad; Mavis Staples turns the folk-blues lament of "Someday" into rousing Stax soul/gospel; and Womack segues effortlessly from "Wicked Rain" into his '70s blaxploitation classic, "Across 110th Street." Of the newer material, the band shines brightest on "La Venganza de Los Pelados," a Latin dance workout with Café Tacuba, and the bluesy soul of "Chains of Love," which shreds 12-bar formula by including a 90-second violin solo. The latter is a tribute to '50s rock & rollers Don and Dewey, proving that the best road to the future is sometimes paved by revisiting the distant past. --Keith Moerer


Wolf Tracks: Best of Los Lobos

Review With Gates of Gold, LOS LOBOS bring their powerhouse mix of Rock, Tex-Mex, Country, Folk, and Blues. From start to finish, the lyrics and mood evoke a rich American saga in the tradition of Faulkner and Steinbeck from this truly original multi- Grammy award winning band from East LA on their first studio album in five years.
Gates Of Gold

Review This triple-Grammy winning group of consummate musicians and songwriters out of East L.A. began their career interpreting Mexican folk music and went on to be a globally renowned purvayor of a diverse and adventurous repertoire of roots-flavored masterpieces. Drawing from rock, country, blues, folk, R&B, Americana, and traditional Spanish and Latin American idioms, Los Lobos continually pushed the boundaries of their sound, while remaining magnificently gritty and graceful throughout. Warner. 2006.
Just Another Band from East L.A.: A Collection

Review Wonderful 1984 album from East LA legends, co-produced by T-Bone Burnett. Includes 'Don't Worry Baby'.
Playlist: The Very Best Of Los Lonely Boys

Review Los Lobos's ability to wade through disparate musical styles isn't the stuff of Elvis and the Beatles, but Los Lobos did it on their debut album. And, unlike much of the material Los Lobos cut their teeth on as a Los Angeles Top 40 cover band, there is nothing lowest-common-denominator about the band's original music. "Don't Worry Baby" is a blues rocker gritty enough for John Lee Hooker; rockabilly meets country, courtesy of David Hidalgo's lap steel, on "Our Last Night"; Cesar Rosas pays homage to the band's Mexican roots on the mariachi-style "Corrido #1"; and "Will the Wolf Survive?" is an infectious jangle rocker that became an early MTV hit. Seamless. File under American Music. --Bill Crandall
Kiko (20Th Anniversary Edition)

Review Los Lobos is celebrating the 20th anniversary of their seminal album Kiko with the release of Kiko 20th Anniversary Edition on CD. The Kiko 20th Anniversary Edition is newly remastered, and features bonus material including demo versions of album tracks and live recordings, and new liner notes written by Los Angeles journalist and longtime friend of the band, Luis Torres.

Released in 1992, Kiko was embraced by fans and hailed by critics as the band s defining moment, the album that put Los Lobos back on the innovation track. Kiko was produced by Mitchell Froom, who received a Grammy nomination for Producer of the Year for his work on the album, and who had previously collaborated with the band on La Bamba. Dubbed one of the albums of the decade by The Wall Street Journal, "the album of the year" by the Los Angeles Times and the Chicago Tribune, and one of "The Essential Recordings of the '90s" by Rolling Stone, Los Lobos also took home an MTV Music Video Award for Breakthrough Video for "Kiko and the Lavender Moon" in 1993.
By the Light of the Moon

Review Just Another Band From East L.A.: A Collection by Los Lobos

When sold by Amazon.com, this product will be manufactured on demand using CD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.


How Will The Wolf Survive

Review Even the title of this terrific two-disc compilation--a play on the title of an early-'70s recording by Frank Zappa and the Mothers of Invention--displays just how clever and hip this great L.A. band has always been. Just Another Band is everything an anthology should be, touching on all the best-known moments ("Don't Worry Baby," "Will the Wolf Survive?," "One Time One Night," "La Bamba," etc.), spanning their career from its origins through Kiko (six tracks from which are featured here), arguably their finest hour. Musically, you get hard R&B, Tex-Mex, pure traditional Mexican music, pop-rock, gorgeous ballads, and pure, raucous rock & roll. Actually, pure is the operative word here--and fans who already own all the albums proper will probably still want this for the soundtrack cuts, live versions (including a performance of their great "Let's Say Goodnight"), unreleased outtakes, cool live cover versions (from both Marvin Gaye and Cream!), and even their terrific "I Wanna Be Like You (The Monkey Song)," originally performed by Louis Prima in The Jungle Book, from the late-1980s, Hal Wilner-produced Disney tribute, Stay Awake. How will the wolves survive? Damn well, from every indication on this fine collection. --Bill Holdship
La Pistola y El Corazon

Review Collection of live tracks assembled by Los Lobos member Cesar Rosas. This is the second volume in a continuing series of limited releases issued by the band. This release contains live cuts recorded by the band in 1997. Los Lobos is a multiple Grammy Awardwinning rock band from East Los Angeles, California. Their music is influenced by rock n roll, Tex-Mex, country, folk, R&B, blues, brown-eyed soul, and traditional music such as cumbia, boleros and norteños. They gained international stardom in 1987 when their cover version of Ritchie Valens' "La Bamba" (from the film of the same name) topped the charts in the US, the UK and in several other countries.
Town & The City

Review CD reissue. This fantastic live album from the Latino Rockers from Los Angeles was only available at Los Lobos shows on their December 2007 tour and through the band's web site. Blending the blues, rockabilly, jazz, Latin and their own Mexican-American heritage, Los Lobos subtly challenge listeners with conscience-raising songs and thought-provoking lyrics. Features 11 tracks including 'Colossal Head', 'Revolution' and Don't Worry Baby'. Los Lobos Records.

Reviews         Home