John Schlesinger Reviews

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Darling

Review A young Hollywood art director gets a taste of the seedy, decadent underbelly of the movie industry.
Genre: Feature Film-Drama
Rating: R
Release Date: 8-JUN-2004
Media Type: DVD
Petulia

Review Nathanael West's The Day of the Locust is by consensus the great Hollywood novel, a poison-pen letter aimed squarely at the tinsel heart of the movie biz. Only in the 1970s could Hollywood actually hazard a film of this story, and the result is suitably corrosive. William Atherton is the observer Tod, Karen Black the blond starlet Faye, and Donald Sutherland the hulking Homer--but they are easily out-acted by the colorful supporting cast. In particular, Burgess Meredith's exhausted showbizzy salesman and Billy Barty's strutting dwarf are superbly crafted gargoyles in this Hollywood wax museum. Director John Schlesinger piles on the rancid atmosphere and rampant hypocrisy until the movie fairly drowns in its own grotesque vision. Long before the climactic apocalyptic riot, the film has torn itself up. There's no substitute for West's wicked prose, so the adaptation comes across as a literal-minded screech rather than a true bonfire of the vanities. --Robert Horton
BILLY LIAR

Review Strauss' dazzling opera is set in 1740's Vienna and produced by Oscar-®-winning film director John Schlesinger (Midnight Cowboy). Starring Kiri Te Kanawa.
The Servant

Review John Schlesinger followed his Academy Award–winning Midnight Cowboy with this sophisticated and highly personal take on love and sex. Sunday Bloody Sunday depicts the romantic lives of two Londoners, a middle-aged doctor and a prickly thirtysomething divorcée—played by Oscar winners Peter Finch (Network) and Glenda Jackson (Women in Love)—who are sleeping with the same handsome young artist (Murray Head). A revelation in its day, this may be the 1970s’ most intelligent, multitextured film about the complexities of romantic relationships; it is keenly acted and sensitively directed, from a penetrating screenplay by novelist and critic Penelope Gilliatt.
The Go-Between

Review A young Hollywood art director gets a taste of the seedy, decadent underbelly of the movie industry.
Genre: Feature Film-Drama
Rating: R
Release Date: 8-JUN-2004
Media Type: DVD
Georgy Girl

Review Nathanael West's The Day of the Locust is by consensus the great Hollywood novel, a poison-pen letter aimed squarely at the tinsel heart of the movie biz. Only in the 1970s could Hollywood actually hazard a film of this story, and the result is suitably corrosive. William Atherton is the observer Tod, Karen Black the blond starlet Faye, and Donald Sutherland the hulking Homer--but they are easily out-acted by the colorful supporting cast. In particular, Burgess Meredith's exhausted showbizzy salesman and Billy Barty's strutting dwarf are superbly crafted gargoyles in this Hollywood wax museum. Director John Schlesinger piles on the rancid atmosphere and rampant hypocrisy until the movie fairly drowns in its own grotesque vision. Long before the climactic apocalyptic riot, the film has torn itself up. There's no substitute for West's wicked prose, so the adaptation comes across as a literal-minded screech rather than a true bonfire of the vanities. --Robert Horton
Shampoo

Review Strauss' dazzling opera is set in 1740's Vienna and produced by Oscar-®-winning film director John Schlesinger (Midnight Cowboy). Starring Kiri Te Kanawa.
Sunday Bloody Sunday

Review John Schlesinger followed his Academy Award–winning Midnight Cowboy with this sophisticated and highly personal take on love and sex. Sunday Bloody Sunday depicts the romantic lives of two Londoners, a middle-aged doctor and a prickly thirtysomething divorcée—played by Oscar winners Peter Finch (Network) and Glenda Jackson (Women in Love)—who are sleeping with the same handsome young artist (Murray Head). A revelation in its day, this may be the 1970s’ most intelligent, multitextured film about the complexities of romantic relationships; it is keenly acted and sensitively directed, from a penetrating screenplay by novelist and critic Penelope Gilliatt.

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