Jenna Elfman Reviews

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Wild Horses: Judgment with Jenna Elfman

Review A San Francisco newspaper film critic becomes pregnant after a hookup with a much younger man and together they raise a nontraditional family. Golden Globe Award winner, Jenna Elfman plays Billie, who after a hard breakup with her boss, James, played by Private Practice's Grant Show, then gets knocked up by Zack, Windfall's Jon Foster. They make a nontraditional arrangement to live together platonically and raise the child. But when Zack friends turn her place into a frat house, Billie isn't sure that the plan can work out.
Keeping the Faith

Review In a Chicago jail cell, clever and charming Ellena Roberts recounts for attorney Sara Miller the details of a one-night stand that led to a heated love affair with prominent surgeon David Stillman. David's version of the facts differs entirely and he insists that he never slept with Ellena. Sure that the doctor is the one who's lying, Sara is preparing to defend her client in court when some disturbing facts emerge.
Along Came Polly

Review Fatal Attraction meets A Beautiful Mind in this fact-based Lifetime thriller. Jenna Elfman (Dharma and Greg) is sexually confident medical writer Ellena Roberts. Shortly after we meet her, she is arrested. While in jail, she meets with sympathetic defense attorney Sara Miller (Kate Burton) and recounts her side of the story. It seems she had a relationship with married surgeon David Stillman (Sam Robards), but he broke it off. She didn't want things to end and continued to write, to call, etc. She didn't make any threats, but nor would she give it a rest, so he called the cops. The case goes to court and David claims he knew Ellena professionally, but that they never had a relationship. By the end, we have a pretty good idea as to what really happened. That's because one person is sane--and therefore credible--while the other is not. --Kathleen C. Fennessy
Raising Helen

Review Ben Stiller (THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS), Jenna Elfman (EdTV), and Edward Norton (FIGHT CLUB) star in KEEPING THE FAITH, a sexy romantic comedy so fresh and funny, you'll fall head over heels in love! Jake Schram (Stiller) and Brian Finn (Norton) are single, successful, extremely popular guys who have been best friends since, well, forever. They are about to be reunited with their other best childhood buddy -- the feisty, lanky tomboy, Anna (Elfman). Anna has grown into a high-powered workaholic beauty whose reentry into their lives turns this old circle of friends into a love triangle -- a very complicated one at that, because Jake's a rabbi and Brian is a priest. But have faith -- this gem is going to steal your heart.
Coffee Shop

Review Now that it’s clear to their families that Dharma Finkelstein (Jenna Elfman) and Greg Montgomery (Thomas Gibson) are truly soul mates, the couple can settle into their marriage, for better or for weird. While Greg’s career as a federal prosecutor is going full steam ahead, Dharma’s contributions to the work force are hilariously off track – especially when she decides to enter politics – in the witty, funny, romantic second season of Dharma & Greg.

When sold by Amazon.com, this product will be manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.

This product is expected to play back in DVD Video "play only" devices, and may not play in other DVD devices, including recorders and PC drives.


Youth in Oregon

Review The complete first season of the TV series Dharma & Greg.
Laws of Attraction

Review Opposites most definitely attract, but the inevitable conflict and dawning sense of the immense challenges of co-existing with one's opposite generally doom such relationships to quick failure. In this 1997 Fox Television sitcom, Dharma Finkelstein (Jenna Elfman), a free-spirited yoga instructor, and Greg Montgomery (Thomas Gibson), a conservative lawyer from the U.S. Attorney's office, catch sight of one another on the subway, impulsively fly to Reno, and get married the very same day. There are bound to be some rough days ahead for the new couple and, indeed, their first fight follows quickly as Greg bemoans Dharma's propensity to say whatever is on her mind regardless of social proprieties. The first meeting between Dharma's hippie parents (Mimi Kennedy and Alan Rachins) and Greg's ultra-conservative parents (Susan Sullivan and Mitchel Ryan) is expectedly problematic and parental friction figures prominently throughout this first season. Whether it's personal routines, cherished celebrations, politics, relationships with friends, or philosophies on discipline, Dharma and Greg can be counted on to see just about everything from opposite perspectives and their conflicting views infallibly collide full force, generating an explosion of comedy on impact. Bonus features include audio commentary on selected episodes, a featurette on the creation and maturation of the show and its characters that features interviews with the executive producers and many of the actors, the original post-show vanity cards that aired briefly after some episodes, and an interactive "Reaching Your Inner Dharma" game that tests viewers trivia knowledge and ability to think like Dharma. --Tami Horiuchi
Two Weeks Notice

Review A San Francisco newspaper film critic becomes pregnant after a hookup with a much younger man and together they raise a nontraditional family. Golden Globe Award winner, Jenna Elfman plays Billie, who after a hard breakup with her boss, James, played by Private Practice's Grant Show, then gets knocked up by Zack, Windfall's Jon Foster. They make a nontraditional arrangement to live together platonically and raise the child. But when Zack friends turn her place into a frat house, Billie isn't sure that the plan can work out.
Forget Paris

Review In a Chicago jail cell, clever and charming Ellena Roberts recounts for attorney Sara Miller the details of a one-night stand that led to a heated love affair with prominent surgeon David Stillman. David's version of the facts differs entirely and he insists that he never slept with Ellena. Sure that the doctor is the one who's lying, Sara is preparing to defend her client in court when some disturbing facts emerge.
Life Or Something Like It

Review Fatal Attraction meets A Beautiful Mind in this fact-based Lifetime thriller. Jenna Elfman (Dharma and Greg) is sexually confident medical writer Ellena Roberts. Shortly after we meet her, she is arrested. While in jail, she meets with sympathetic defense attorney Sara Miller (Kate Burton) and recounts her side of the story. It seems she had a relationship with married surgeon David Stillman (Sam Robards), but he broke it off. She didn't want things to end and continued to write, to call, etc. She didn't make any threats, but nor would she give it a rest, so he called the cops. The case goes to court and David claims he knew Ellena professionally, but that they never had a relationship. By the end, we have a pretty good idea as to what really happened. That's because one person is sane--and therefore credible--while the other is not. --Kathleen C. Fennessy
Prime

Review Ben Stiller (THE ROYAL TENENBAUMS), Jenna Elfman (EdTV), and Edward Norton (FIGHT CLUB) star in KEEPING THE FAITH, a sexy romantic comedy so fresh and funny, you'll fall head over heels in love! Jake Schram (Stiller) and Brian Finn (Norton) are single, successful, extremely popular guys who have been best friends since, well, forever. They are about to be reunited with their other best childhood buddy -- the feisty, lanky tomboy, Anna (Elfman). Anna has grown into a high-powered workaholic beauty whose reentry into their lives turns this old circle of friends into a love triangle -- a very complicated one at that, because Jake's a rabbi and Brian is a priest. But have faith -- this gem is going to steal your heart.
The Family Man

Review Now that it’s clear to their families that Dharma Finkelstein (Jenna Elfman) and Greg Montgomery (Thomas Gibson) are truly soul mates, the couple can settle into their marriage, for better or for weird. While Greg’s career as a federal prosecutor is going full steam ahead, Dharma’s contributions to the work force are hilariously off track – especially when she decides to enter politics – in the witty, funny, romantic second season of Dharma & Greg.

When sold by Amazon.com, this product will be manufactured on demand using DVD-R recordable media. Amazon.com's standard return policy will apply.

This product is expected to play back in DVD Video "play only" devices, and may not play in other DVD devices, including recorders and PC drives.


Accidentally on Purpose: Season 1

Review The complete first season of the TV series Dharma & Greg.
Dharma & Greg: The Complete Season 2

Review Opposites most definitely attract, but the inevitable conflict and dawning sense of the immense challenges of co-existing with one's opposite generally doom such relationships to quick failure. In this 1997 Fox Television sitcom, Dharma Finkelstein (Jenna Elfman), a free-spirited yoga instructor, and Greg Montgomery (Thomas Gibson), a conservative lawyer from the U.S. Attorney's office, catch sight of one another on the subway, impulsively fly to Reno, and get married the very same day. There are bound to be some rough days ahead for the new couple and, indeed, their first fight follows quickly as Greg bemoans Dharma's propensity to say whatever is on her mind regardless of social proprieties. The first meeting between Dharma's hippie parents (Mimi Kennedy and Alan Rachins) and Greg's ultra-conservative parents (Susan Sullivan and Mitchel Ryan) is expectedly problematic and parental friction figures prominently throughout this first season. Whether it's personal routines, cherished celebrations, politics, relationships with friends, or philosophies on discipline, Dharma and Greg can be counted on to see just about everything from opposite perspectives and their conflicting views infallibly collide full force, generating an explosion of comedy on impact. Bonus features include audio commentary on selected episodes, a featurette on the creation and maturation of the show and its characters that features interviews with the executive producers and many of the actors, the original post-show vanity cards that aired briefly after some episodes, and an interactive "Reaching Your Inner Dharma" game that tests viewers trivia knowledge and ability to think like Dharma. --Tami Horiuchi

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