Dmx Reviews

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The Best Of DMX

Review DMX - THE BEST OF - CD
Greatest Hits

Review Plays fine, sounds sublime. From a well cared for personal collection. Buy with confidence--see my feedback. Thanks and enjoy this great CD.
Greatest Hits

Review Watching DMX--baldheaded and shirtless, tattooed and musclebound--as he simultaneously goes platinum and gets arrested on rape charges (both of which occurred within weeks of this album's release), one can easily see the Yonkers, New York, rapper as a Tupac in training. And he's certainly no stranger to dumb thuggery on his much-anticipated debut. But unlike Tupac, who tempered hard-core beatdowns with party pick-me-ups, DMX is strictly business, part of a street reaction against the Puff Daddy-fueled, late-1990s slew of lightweight pop-rap crossovers. With a name too true for its own good, It's Dark and Hell Is Hot could occasionally use a cool breeze of levity. That said, the record is not without merit; despite the album's largely standard-issue beats and rhymes, both DMX's forceful voice and solid production have moments of greatness. At times DMX even manages to squeeze memorable hooks out of this otherwise claustrophobic release. --Roni Sarig
2Pac Greatest Hits

Review DMX - FLESH OF MY FLESH BLOOD OF MY BLOOD - CD
The Best Of Busta Rhymes

Review One of the breakout stars of 1998, DMX wasted little time in following up his No. 1 album It's Dark and Hell Is Hot with Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood. If the quick turnaround seems surprising, maybe it's because DMX's second LP doesn't fall far from the original tree. Key to his formula, DMX has mastered the art of thug-life anthems, following in the dubious footsteps of 2Pac and Noreaga. While his gruff voice and simple delivery help make his songs infectious, they're rarely creative, especially with anemic beats, redundant subject matter, and his trademark barks. Basically, Flesh of My Flesh is a perfect buy for those who couldn't wait a whole year for another DMX LP, but it won't convert many new listeners. --Oliver Wang
The Hits Collection, Vol. 1

Review Excellent condition and playability.
Greatest Hits

Review All the barking and growling in the world could not detract from the fact that DMX is a troubled, tormented soul. On And Then There Was X, the multiplatinum-selling Dark Man X uses his signature fragmented flow with its singsongy vocal inflections to preach, teach, and reveal. Melodramatic storytelling has always been his shtick, whether it's tales of robbing liquor stores, plotting violent murders, or teaching shorties the code of the streets. X's inner conflicts are laid out on "Angel," a dialogue between himself and his Lord, and his ability to acknowledge different perspectives of a situation (i.e., repercussions) on several songs add depth to his character. The anthemlike "What's My Name," with its affirmations "I have no friends" and "I'm not a nice person," proves that money, fame, and popularity do not translate into happiness for DMX. --Celine Wong
2001

Review DMX - GREAT DEPRESSION - CD
It's Dark And Hell Is Hot

Review Despite the overwrought production and excessive use of trite catch phrases that typifies the output of today's corporate rap elite, Dark Man's innate raw power can't be masked. Had he fallen off, The Great Depression would be considered an amazing comeback, but since X's reputation is intact and it's hip-hop as a genre that's floundering, the album serves as an antidote to the flood of insipid hip-hop/R&B combinations and "Oochie Wally"-isms that clog the airwaves. Standout tracks include the riot-inducing "Who We Be" and the dead-on "Shorty Was Da Bomb." Even the lesser tunes are dope. On first listen, Depression's most accessible song, "We Right Here," comes off as mindless radio fodder, but its blunt chorus quickly grows on you. The album's centerpiece, "I Miss You," is a genuinely personal composition built around a universal theme. Here, DMX's lyrics and delivery invite the same favorable comparisons to Tupac Shakur that he received earlier in his career. --Rebecca Levine
Legend of the Wu-Tang: Wu-Tang Clan's Greatest Hits

Review Baltimore born, Yonkers raised rapper DMX has had five #1 albums! DMX connects with his audience using aggressive lyrics focusing on strength and survival while overcoming the adversity of life on the streets. The album features Notorious B.I.G., Machine Gun Kelly, Sean Kingston, Adreena Mills, Dani Stevenshon, and Rachel Taylor. Produced by: Swizz Beatz, Deezle, Grease, Caviar, Bird Tronzilla, Elite.
4:44

Review DMX - GRAND CHAMP - CD
It's Dark And Hell Is Hot

Review Earl Simmons, better known by his stage names DMX or Dark Man X. He has acted in films such as Belly, Romeo Must Die, Exit Wounds, Cradle 2 The Grave, and Last Hour. In 2006, he starred in the reality television series DMX: Soul of a Man, which was primarily aired on the BET cable television network. DMX has sold over 30 million records worldwide, making him one of the best-selling hip-hop artists of all time. X returns with his 8th solo release, 16 tracks in the full essence of DMX.
The packaging is a Limited Edition 2 CD's/DVD all in a 'Slip case'. Includes the brand new 'Redemption Of The Beast' CD and the deluxe version, of the out of print, 2012 release 'Undisputed' CD/DVD. DVD contains 35 minutes of behind the scenes documentary and videos.
Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood

Review The DMX story is the stuff of legends, but like all good legends, it bears repeating. Born in Baltimore and raised in Yonkers, New York, DMX endured an exceptionally difficult childhood. Shuttling between group homes, in and out of trouble with the law, he might have been destined for a tragic life, if not for his extraordinary talent for expressing himself through rap. Armed with one of the most ferocious flows in the history of hip-hop.
And Then There Was X

Review DMX - THE BEST OF - CD
The Great Depression

Review Plays fine, sounds sublime. From a well cared for personal collection. Buy with confidence--see my feedback. Thanks and enjoy this great CD.
Grand Champ

Review Watching DMX--baldheaded and shirtless, tattooed and musclebound--as he simultaneously goes platinum and gets arrested on rape charges (both of which occurred within weeks of this album's release), one can easily see the Yonkers, New York, rapper as a Tupac in training. And he's certainly no stranger to dumb thuggery on his much-anticipated debut. But unlike Tupac, who tempered hard-core beatdowns with party pick-me-ups, DMX is strictly business, part of a street reaction against the Puff Daddy-fueled, late-1990s slew of lightweight pop-rap crossovers. With a name too true for its own good, It's Dark and Hell Is Hot could occasionally use a cool breeze of levity. That said, the record is not without merit; despite the album's largely standard-issue beats and rhymes, both DMX's forceful voice and solid production have moments of greatness. At times DMX even manages to squeeze memorable hooks out of this otherwise claustrophobic release. --Roni Sarig
Get Rich Or Die Tryin'

Review DMX - FLESH OF MY FLESH BLOOD OF MY BLOOD - CD
The Infamous

Review One of the breakout stars of 1998, DMX wasted little time in following up his No. 1 album It's Dark and Hell Is Hot with Flesh of My Flesh, Blood of My Blood. If the quick turnaround seems surprising, maybe it's because DMX's second LP doesn't fall far from the original tree. Key to his formula, DMX has mastered the art of thug-life anthems, following in the dubious footsteps of 2Pac and Noreaga. While his gruff voice and simple delivery help make his songs infectious, they're rarely creative, especially with anemic beats, redundant subject matter, and his trademark barks. Basically, Flesh of My Flesh is a perfect buy for those who couldn't wait a whole year for another DMX LP, but it won't convert many new listeners. --Oliver Wang
Life After Death

Review Excellent condition and playability.
The Best Of DMX

Review All the barking and growling in the world could not detract from the fact that DMX is a troubled, tormented soul. On And Then There Was X, the multiplatinum-selling Dark Man X uses his signature fragmented flow with its singsongy vocal inflections to preach, teach, and reveal. Melodramatic storytelling has always been his shtick, whether it's tales of robbing liquor stores, plotting violent murders, or teaching shorties the code of the streets. X's inner conflicts are laid out on "Angel," a dialogue between himself and his Lord, and his ability to acknowledge different perspectives of a situation (i.e., repercussions) on several songs add depth to his character. The anthemlike "What's My Name," with its affirmations "I have no friends" and "I'm not a nice person," proves that money, fame, and popularity do not translate into happiness for DMX. --Celine Wong

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