D.j. Pooh Reviews

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The Wash

Review Get ready for the most wonderful, most special Pooh adventure ever! The beloved bear and his playful pals meet up in Christopher Robin's room, where they discover Christopher's treasured storybook filled with endearing tales written about them! These amazing stories come magically to life and the whole cast of Pooh characters appears in a fresh new way in chapter after enchanting chapter! "The tubby little cubby never looked so wholesomely cuddly," raves Child Magazine. See what happens when Tigger believes he's lost his bounce; when Kessie and friends get lost in the Hundred Acre Wood; when Eeyore experiences a most exciting day -- and much, much more! THE BOOK OF POOH: STORIES FROM THE HEART features innovative, lifelike puppetry and computer animation, six great new songs, plus the wonderfully familiar voices you've grown to love. For learning, fun, and imagination that never ends, join Winnie the Pooh and his lovable friends!
The Player's Club

Review While Disney didn't invent Winnie the Pooh, nor first animate him, it certainly has Americanized the British bear into a cartoon character hardly resembling A.A. Milne's original 1924 creation. Although Disney's four Storybook Classics titles (from 1966) were somewhat faithful to Milne's concept, subsequent titles (especially in the Playtime and Learning series) descended into second-rate TV fare. All this to say that Disney has redeemed itself with The Book of Pooh, a fresh batch of Pooh stories evoking a nostalgic nod to the original. The Disney Channel's full-length film Stories from the Heart is a puppet rendition of Pooh, set in a sparkling world of computer animation (not unlike Bear in the Big Blue House, which shares the same executive producer and director, Mitchell Kriegman). The puppets (by Shadow Projects) may take some getting used to by viewers accustomed to animated cartoons, yet they'll appreciate the characters' lifelike personalities. The 77-minute program is a collection of six tales focusing on Pooh, Piglet, Owl, and the gang (though Kanga and Roo are noticeably absent). Mark Zaslove deserves writing kudos for subtle humor (reminiscent of Milne) and storytelling restraint uncharacteristic of Disney. Highlights include "Eeyore's Tailiversary," in which Eeyore receives a surprise party to celebrate the day he and his tail became attached, and "Tigger's Replacement," which chronicles Tigger's attempts to teach Piglet how to be a Tigger. (Lessons in bouncing and Tiggerisms are part of his Rigorous Tiggerous Training Program.) Many of the puppets' voices are familiar, such as Jim Cummings (The Tigger Movie) as Pooh and Tigger. Six musical numbers round out this welcome entry in Disney's Winnie the Pooh collection. --Lynn Gibson
All About the Benjamins

Review This third installment of the Disney Pooh series, first released in 1974, is perhaps the liveliest, in part because the hyperactively bouncy stuffed tiger of the title seems tailor-made for animation. The story line, in which Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, and company have to come to terms with the disruptive new presence in the Hundred Acre Wood, could almost be described as morally uplifting. And the character's theme song, "The Wonderful Thing About Tiggers," is the only really memorable number in the entire series; your kid will be singing it for days. The throaty tones of Paul Winchell, as Tigger, are a definite asset--and voice choices are by no means a neutral issue. When Disney chose the familiar tenor of in-house voiceover performer Sterling Holloway for the title character, it was a good example of what the politically minded call an "appropriative" gesture: a way of enveloping A.A. Milne's great children's book hero, of transforming him instantly into a generic Disney character. (You would never guess from the Disney renditions of Christopher that in the books, originally published in the 1920s, everybody was British.) The marketing machinations came full circle when Disney purchased rights to the original drawings by illustrator Ernest Shephard; merchandise depicting the two versions of the characters are now sold side by side in The Disney Store, like so many cans of New and Classic Coke. --David Chute
I Got the Hook Up

Review Your family will love "Pooh Learning," a special collection that offers loving lessons on growing up with Pooh and all his friends from the Hundred Acre Wood. In "Cloud, Cloud Go Away," Tigger makes friends with a lonely cloud, and then "Tigger's Houseguest" turns out to be a hungry termite! In "The Bug Stops Here," Christopher Robin discovers an irresistable insect, and "Tigger Is The Mother Of Invention" proves good work is its own reward ... especially for Piglet!
Baby Boy

Review Join Pooh and his pals from the Hundred Acre Wood for play-along fun that's full of laughter and imagination! New discoveries await within each delightful adventure! Pooh referees a rollicking game where only the ball appears to be winning in WHAT'S THE SCORE, POOH? Then, a lively cross-country race teaches everyone that winning isn't everything in PRIZE PIGLET! And PIGLET'S POOHETRY party turns into quite a story when Tigger rhymes a few lines of his own!
Paper Soldiers

Review Angell Conwell, DJ Pooh, Dr. Dre, George Wallace, Snoop Doggy Dogg, Tom "Tiny" Lister, Jr. - Director: Mark Jordan In this DJ Pooh-directed comedy, Dee Loc (Snoop Dogg) and Sean (Dr. Dre) are roommates working at a car wash run by the ill-tempered Mr.
ATL

Review Winnie the Pooh and Christmas Too
Next Day Air

Review A great story: Pooh is so busy gathering up his friends' wish lists for Santa that he forgets to include his own. After retrieving the list and adding his own desires, he realizes he's late getting it where it needs to go. Off he goes to the North Pole on Christmas Eve, with pals Eeyore, Tigger, Piglet, Rabbit, and Christopher Robin missing him. --Tom Keogh
How High

Review The homogenized Disney version of Pooh Bear is so firmly established by now that it has virtually supplanted the classic A.A. Milne/Ernest Shephard renditions of the Hundred Acre Wood characters, introduced in a series of British children's books first published in the 1920s. This initial installment won director Wolfgang Reitherman (The Jungle Book) a 1966 Oscar for Best Animated Short Film, and at the time the prize seemed a bad joke, a self-administered pat on the back for deflavorized commercial kid-culture. The Disneyfication of the planet has progressed to the point that this early, gentle, tuneful outing looks pretty benign, almost a beloved artifact in its own right. The sickly songs by Richard M. and Robert B. Sherman (Mary Poppins) qualify as camp classics. The inimitable growly tones of Sterling Holloway, as Pooh, are a definite asset, although the melancholy donkey Eeyore (voice by Ralph Wright, who also wrote the screenplay) is probably the most successful page-to-screen translation, lugubrious and droll at the same time. --David Chute
State Property

Review In "All's Well That Ends Well," Tigger is up to his whiskers in birthday wishes from friends. "Stripes" features the character in a state of alarm when he loses his markings, and in "Luck Amok," he learns he has good friends. The accent is on Pooh's delightful friend in this video, and the programs are wonderfully written, charmingly animated, and strongly characterized. --Tom Keogh
Next Friday

Review Get ready for the most wonderful, most special Pooh adventure ever! The beloved bear and his playful pals meet up in Christopher Robin's room, where they discover Christopher's treasured storybook filled with endearing tales written about them! These amazing stories come magically to life and the whole cast of Pooh characters appears in a fresh new way in chapter after enchanting chapter! "The tubby little cubby never looked so wholesomely cuddly," raves Child Magazine. See what happens when Tigger believes he's lost his bounce; when Kessie and friends get lost in the Hundred Acre Wood; when Eeyore experiences a most exciting day -- and much, much more! THE BOOK OF POOH: STORIES FROM THE HEART features innovative, lifelike puppetry and computer animation, six great new songs, plus the wonderfully familiar voices you've grown to love. For learning, fun, and imagination that never ends, join Winnie the Pooh and his lovable friends!
Friday

Review While Disney didn't invent Winnie the Pooh, nor first animate him, it certainly has Americanized the British bear into a cartoon character hardly resembling A.A. Milne's original 1924 creation. Although Disney's four Storybook Classics titles (from 1966) were somewhat faithful to Milne's concept, subsequent titles (especially in the Playtime and Learning series) descended into second-rate TV fare. All this to say that Disney has redeemed itself with The Book of Pooh, a fresh batch of Pooh stories evoking a nostalgic nod to the original. The Disney Channel's full-length film Stories from the Heart is a puppet rendition of Pooh, set in a sparkling world of computer animation (not unlike Bear in the Big Blue House, which shares the same executive producer and director, Mitchell Kriegman). The puppets (by Shadow Projects) may take some getting used to by viewers accustomed to animated cartoons, yet they'll appreciate the characters' lifelike personalities. The 77-minute program is a collection of six tales focusing on Pooh, Piglet, Owl, and the gang (though Kanga and Roo are noticeably absent). Mark Zaslove deserves writing kudos for subtle humor (reminiscent of Milne) and storytelling restraint uncharacteristic of Disney. Highlights include "Eeyore's Tailiversary," in which Eeyore receives a surprise party to celebrate the day he and his tail became attached, and "Tigger's Replacement," which chronicles Tigger's attempts to teach Piglet how to be a Tigger. (Lessons in bouncing and Tiggerisms are part of his Rigorous Tiggerous Training Program.) Many of the puppets' voices are familiar, such as Jim Cummings (The Tigger Movie) as Pooh and Tigger. Six musical numbers round out this welcome entry in Disney's Winnie the Pooh collection. --Lynn Gibson
Next Friday

Review This third installment of the Disney Pooh series, first released in 1974, is perhaps the liveliest, in part because the hyperactively bouncy stuffed tiger of the title seems tailor-made for animation. The story line, in which Pooh, Piglet, Eeyore, and company have to come to terms with the disruptive new presence in the Hundred Acre Wood, could almost be described as morally uplifting. And the character's theme song, "The Wonderful Thing About Tiggers," is the only really memorable number in the entire series; your kid will be singing it for days. The throaty tones of Paul Winchell, as Tigger, are a definite asset--and voice choices are by no means a neutral issue. When Disney chose the familiar tenor of in-house voiceover performer Sterling Holloway for the title character, it was a good example of what the politically minded call an "appropriative" gesture: a way of enveloping A.A. Milne's great children's book hero, of transforming him instantly into a generic Disney character. (You would never guess from the Disney renditions of Christopher that in the books, originally published in the 1920s, everybody was British.) The marketing machinations came full circle when Disney purchased rights to the original drawings by illustrator Ernest Shephard; merchandise depicting the two versions of the characters are now sold side by side in The Disney Store, like so many cans of New and Classic Coke. --David Chute
Friday After Next

Review Your family will love "Pooh Learning," a special collection that offers loving lessons on growing up with Pooh and all his friends from the Hundred Acre Wood. In "Cloud, Cloud Go Away," Tigger makes friends with a lonely cloud, and then "Tigger's Houseguest" turns out to be a hungry termite! In "The Bug Stops Here," Christopher Robin discovers an irresistable insect, and "Tigger Is The Mother Of Invention" proves good work is its own reward ... especially for Piglet!
Friday (Director's Cut)

Review Join Pooh and his pals from the Hundred Acre Wood for play-along fun that's full of laughter and imagination! New discoveries await within each delightful adventure! Pooh referees a rollicking game where only the ball appears to be winning in WHAT'S THE SCORE, POOH? Then, a lively cross-country race teaches everyone that winning isn't everything in PRIZE PIGLET! And PIGLET'S POOHETRY party turns into quite a story when Tigger rhymes a few lines of his own!
Boyz n' The Hood

Review Angell Conwell, DJ Pooh, Dr. Dre, George Wallace, Snoop Doggy Dogg, Tom "Tiny" Lister, Jr. - Director: Mark Jordan In this DJ Pooh-directed comedy, Dee Loc (Snoop Dogg) and Sean (Dr. Dre) are roommates working at a car wash run by the ill-tempered Mr.
Ride Along 2

Review Winnie the Pooh and Christmas Too
Straight Outta Compton

Review A great story: Pooh is so busy gathering up his friends' wish lists for Santa that he forgets to include his own. After retrieving the list and adding his own desires, he realizes he's late getting it where it needs to go. Off he goes to the North Pole on Christmas Eve, with pals Eeyore, Tigger, Piglet, Rabbit, and Christopher Robin missing him. --Tom Keogh
Menace II Society

Review The homogenized Disney version of Pooh Bear is so firmly established by now that it has virtually supplanted the classic A.A. Milne/Ernest Shephard renditions of the Hundred Acre Wood characters, introduced in a series of British children's books first published in the 1920s. This initial installment won director Wolfgang Reitherman (The Jungle Book) a 1966 Oscar for Best Animated Short Film, and at the time the prize seemed a bad joke, a self-administered pat on the back for deflavorized commercial kid-culture. The Disneyfication of the planet has progressed to the point that this early, gentle, tuneful outing looks pretty benign, almost a beloved artifact in its own right. The sickly songs by Richard M. and Robert B. Sherman (Mary Poppins) qualify as camp classics. The inimitable growly tones of Sterling Holloway, as Pooh, are a definite asset, although the melancholy donkey Eeyore (voice by Ralph Wright, who also wrote the screenplay) is probably the most successful page-to-screen translation, lugubrious and droll at the same time. --David Chute
Baby Boy

Review In "All's Well That Ends Well," Tigger is up to his whiskers in birthday wishes from friends. "Stripes" features the character in a state of alarm when he loses his markings, and in "Luck Amok," he learns he has good friends. The accent is on Pooh's delightful friend in this video, and the programs are wonderfully written, charmingly animated, and strongly characterized. --Tom Keogh

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