D.j. Pooh Reviews

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The Wash

Review Get ready for the most wonderful, most special Pooh adventure ever! The beloved bear and his playful pals meet up in Christopher Robin's room, where they discover Christopher's treasured storybook filled with endearing tales written about them! These amazing stories come magically to life and the whole cast of Pooh characters appears in a fresh new way in chapter after enchanting chapter! "The tubby little cubby never looked so wholesomely cuddly," raves Child Magazine. See what happens when Tigger believes he's lost his bounce; when Kessie and friends get lost in the Hundred Acre Wood; when Eeyore experiences a most exciting day -- and much, much more! THE BOOK OF POOH: STORIES FROM THE HEART features innovative, lifelike puppetry and computer animation, six great new songs, plus the wonderfully familiar voices you've grown to love. For learning, fun, and imagination that never ends, join Winnie the Pooh and his lovable friends!
All About the Benjamins

Review While Disney didn't invent Winnie the Pooh, nor first animate him, it certainly has Americanized the British bear into a cartoon character hardly resembling A.A. Milne's original 1924 creation. Although Disney's four Storybook Classics titles (from 1966) were somewhat faithful to Milne's concept, subsequent titles (especially in the Playtime and Learning series) descended into second-rate TV fare. All this to say that Disney has redeemed itself with The Book of Pooh, a fresh batch of Pooh stories evoking a nostalgic nod to the original. The Disney Channel's full-length film Stories from the Heart is a puppet rendition of Pooh, set in a sparkling world of computer animation (not unlike Bear in the Big Blue House, which shares the same executive producer and director, Mitchell Kriegman). The puppets (by Shadow Projects) may take some getting used to by viewers accustomed to animated cartoons, yet they'll appreciate the characters' lifelike personalities. The 77-minute program is a collection of six tales focusing on Pooh, Piglet, Owl, and the gang (though Kanga and Roo are noticeably absent). Mark Zaslove deserves writing kudos for subtle humor (reminiscent of Milne) and storytelling restraint uncharacteristic of Disney. Highlights include "Eeyore's Tailiversary," in which Eeyore receives a surprise party to celebrate the day he and his tail became attached, and "Tigger's Replacement," which chronicles Tigger's attempts to teach Piglet how to be a Tigger. (Lessons in bouncing and Tiggerisms are part of his Rigorous Tiggerous Training Program.) Many of the puppets' voices are familiar, such as Jim Cummings (The Tigger Movie) as Pooh and Tigger. Six musical numbers round out this welcome entry in Disney's Winnie the Pooh collection. --Lynn Gibson
Paper Soldiers

Review Winnie the Pooh and Christmas Too
The Player's Club

Review A great story: Pooh is so busy gathering up his friends' wish lists for Santa that he forgets to include his own. After retrieving the list and adding his own desires, he realizes he's late getting it where it needs to go. Off he goes to the North Pole on Christmas Eve, with pals Eeyore, Tigger, Piglet, Rabbit, and Christopher Robin missing him. --Tom Keogh
Baby Boy

Review Winnie the Pooh: Happy Pooh Day [VHS] [VHS Tape] [1996] ...
State Property

Review Your family will love "Pooh Learning," a special collection that offers loving lessons on growing up with Pooh and all his friends from the Hundred Acre Wood. In "Cloud, Cloud Go Away," Tigger makes friends with a lonely cloud, and then "Tigger's Houseguest" turns out to be a hungry termite! In "The Bug Stops Here," Christopher Robin discovers an irresistable insect, and "Tigger Is The Mother Of Invention" proves good work is its own reward ... especially for Piglet!
ATL

Review In "All's Well That Ends Well," Tigger is up to his whiskers in birthday wishes from friends. "Stripes" features the character in a state of alarm when he loses his markings, and in "Luck Amok," he learns he has good friends. The accent is on Pooh's delightful friend in this video, and the programs are wonderfully written, charmingly animated, and strongly characterized. --Tom Keogh
I Got the Hook Up

Review Rabbit has a party in "Party Poohper," but the rest of the gang is tied up trying to save bunnies from danger. (Poor Rabbit, rather touchingly, holds the party festivities anyway with stitched-together doll versions of his absent friends.) In "Pooh Day Afternoon," Christopher Robin asks Pooh to be his assistant dog sitter, a serious job that the old bear might not be up to. Good stuff, pleasing animation that moves well, strong characters with real feelings often expressed movingly, and plenty of humor. --Tom Keogh
Next Day Air

Review Join Pooh and his pals from the Hundred Acre Wood for play-along fun that's full of laughter and imagination! New discoveries await within each delightful adventure! Pooh referees a rollicking game where only the ball appears to be winning in WHAT'S THE SCORE, POOH? Then, a lively cross-country race teaches everyone that winning isn't everything in PRIZE PIGLET! And PIGLET'S POOHETRY party turns into quite a story when Tigger rhymes a few lines of his own!
Next Friday

Review Everyone's best friend, Pooh, invites you to share in the lessons of these heartwarming tales that express the value of friendship. In "The Wishing Bear," Pooh tries to make everyone's wishes come true, but discovers that their only wish -- to be his friend -- has already come true! To protect his friends' feelings, Pooh turns a sad farewell into many happy returns in "Good-Bye, Mr. Pooh!" And everyone's "Balloonatics" when somebody breaks Christopher Robin's balloon and they all share the blame!
Lottery Ticket (2010)

Review No childhood is complete without a little magic and Pooh Wishes delightfully delivers it. In The Wishing Bear, the centerpiece of a trio of tales, Pooh learns to wish upon a star, but then struggles to recall the offbeat rhyme. His journey to remember, coupled with his driving need to make sure his friend's wishes come true, is heartachingly sweet. Friendship is also the underlying theme in two other adventures. In Goodbye Mr. Pooh, a surprise party makes the bear think his friends want him to move away, while Balloonatics uses a balloon--another staple of childhood--to show that friends stick together no matter what. It all adds up to three rewarding fables of friendship in three-quarters of an hour. --Valerie J. Nelson
Friday

Review Get ready for the most wonderful, most special Pooh adventure ever! The beloved bear and his playful pals meet up in Christopher Robin's room, where they discover Christopher's treasured storybook filled with endearing tales written about them! These amazing stories come magically to life and the whole cast of Pooh characters appears in a fresh new way in chapter after enchanting chapter! "The tubby little cubby never looked so wholesomely cuddly," raves Child Magazine. See what happens when Tigger believes he's lost his bounce; when Kessie and friends get lost in the Hundred Acre Wood; when Eeyore experiences a most exciting day -- and much, much more! THE BOOK OF POOH: STORIES FROM THE HEART features innovative, lifelike puppetry and computer animation, six great new songs, plus the wonderfully familiar voices you've grown to love. For learning, fun, and imagination that never ends, join Winnie the Pooh and his lovable friends!
Next Friday

Review While Disney didn't invent Winnie the Pooh, nor first animate him, it certainly has Americanized the British bear into a cartoon character hardly resembling A.A. Milne's original 1924 creation. Although Disney's four Storybook Classics titles (from 1966) were somewhat faithful to Milne's concept, subsequent titles (especially in the Playtime and Learning series) descended into second-rate TV fare. All this to say that Disney has redeemed itself with The Book of Pooh, a fresh batch of Pooh stories evoking a nostalgic nod to the original. The Disney Channel's full-length film Stories from the Heart is a puppet rendition of Pooh, set in a sparkling world of computer animation (not unlike Bear in the Big Blue House, which shares the same executive producer and director, Mitchell Kriegman). The puppets (by Shadow Projects) may take some getting used to by viewers accustomed to animated cartoons, yet they'll appreciate the characters' lifelike personalities. The 77-minute program is a collection of six tales focusing on Pooh, Piglet, Owl, and the gang (though Kanga and Roo are noticeably absent). Mark Zaslove deserves writing kudos for subtle humor (reminiscent of Milne) and storytelling restraint uncharacteristic of Disney. Highlights include "Eeyore's Tailiversary," in which Eeyore receives a surprise party to celebrate the day he and his tail became attached, and "Tigger's Replacement," which chronicles Tigger's attempts to teach Piglet how to be a Tigger. (Lessons in bouncing and Tiggerisms are part of his Rigorous Tiggerous Training Program.) Many of the puppets' voices are familiar, such as Jim Cummings (The Tigger Movie) as Pooh and Tigger. Six musical numbers round out this welcome entry in Disney's Winnie the Pooh collection. --Lynn Gibson
GoodFellas

Review Winnie the Pooh and Christmas Too
The Goonies

Review A great story: Pooh is so busy gathering up his friends' wish lists for Santa that he forgets to include his own. After retrieving the list and adding his own desires, he realizes he's late getting it where it needs to go. Off he goes to the North Pole on Christmas Eve, with pals Eeyore, Tigger, Piglet, Rabbit, and Christopher Robin missing him. --Tom Keogh
The Dark Knight

Review Winnie the Pooh: Happy Pooh Day [VHS] [VHS Tape] [1996] ...
Friday After Next

Review Your family will love "Pooh Learning," a special collection that offers loving lessons on growing up with Pooh and all his friends from the Hundred Acre Wood. In "Cloud, Cloud Go Away," Tigger makes friends with a lonely cloud, and then "Tigger's Houseguest" turns out to be a hungry termite! In "The Bug Stops Here," Christopher Robin discovers an irresistable insect, and "Tigger Is The Mother Of Invention" proves good work is its own reward ... especially for Piglet!
Ted (Unrated)

Review In "All's Well That Ends Well," Tigger is up to his whiskers in birthday wishes from friends. "Stripes" features the character in a state of alarm when he loses his markings, and in "Luck Amok," he learns he has good friends. The accent is on Pooh's delightful friend in this video, and the programs are wonderfully written, charmingly animated, and strongly characterized. --Tom Keogh
Batman Begins

Review Rabbit has a party in "Party Poohper," but the rest of the gang is tied up trying to save bunnies from danger. (Poor Rabbit, rather touchingly, holds the party festivities anyway with stitched-together doll versions of his absent friends.) In "Pooh Day Afternoon," Christopher Robin asks Pooh to be his assistant dog sitter, a serious job that the old bear might not be up to. Good stuff, pleasing animation that moves well, strong characters with real feelings often expressed movingly, and plenty of humor. --Tom Keogh
The Dark Knight Rises

Review Join Pooh and his pals from the Hundred Acre Wood for play-along fun that's full of laughter and imagination! New discoveries await within each delightful adventure! Pooh referees a rollicking game where only the ball appears to be winning in WHAT'S THE SCORE, POOH? Then, a lively cross-country race teaches everyone that winning isn't everything in PRIZE PIGLET! And PIGLET'S POOHETRY party turns into quite a story when Tigger rhymes a few lines of his own!

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