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The Three Stooges: The Ultimate Collection

Review Includes 25 years of the Three Stooges unique brand of humor with Moe as boss, Larry the middleman and Curly as their foil. Witness the rise of these comedy icons in this high-spirited collection, which has been re-mastered for the best quality picture and sound. You'll experience the eye-pokes, face slaps, hollow head knocks and knuckle cracks like you've never heard or seen them before.
The Three Stooges Collection (1934 - 1959)

Review Originally airing on A&E's Biography channel, this extensive documentary goes behind the scenes of the legendary comedy show THE THREE STOOGES. Over two hours of previously-unseen footage offers viewers an insightful look at the private lives of everyone's favorite funnymen. Interviews with family and friends of the stars, outtakes, and backstage material help to paint a revealing portrait of the men who made up the hugely popular comic trio. **NON STANDARD PRICING**
The Little Rascals: The Complete Collection

Review SPECIAL FEATURES: FULLSCREEN VERSION, MONO SOUND, LANGUAGES: ENGLISH, SPANISH, AND PORTUGUESE, SUBTITLES IN ENGLISH, SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE, DIGITALLY MASTERED AUDIO & VIDEO, EPISODE SELECTIONS: GRIPS, GRUNTS AND GROANS, ALL THE WORLD'S A STOOGE, 3 DUMB CLUCKS, THREE LITTLE PIRATES AND THREE MORE EPISODES.
The Little Rascals Collectors Edition - 88 Classic Uncut Episodes

Review If you want to hear "nyuk-nyuk-nyuk" in Spanish and Portuguese as well as in English, then the DVD format is for you. The Three Stooges: All the World's a Stooge gives a generous 124 minutes of seven Curly classics in a random order: "Grips, Grunts and Groans" (1937), "The World's a Stooge" (1941), "3 Dumb Clucks" (1937), "Three Little Pirates" (1946), "Uncivil War Birds" (1946), "Back to the Woods" (1937), and "Violent Is the Word for Curly" (1938). The shorts cover some familiar territory; "Grips, Grunts and Groans" is only the Stooges' 20th short in the Columbia series, and it is practically a rewrite of "Punch Drunks," the second. Here Curly is driven wild by a perfume rather than a song and is put into a wrestling ring rather than a boxing ring. Even the backscreen projection of the crowd is the same one used in the earlier film.

"Three Little Pirates" contains the famous "Mahah, Ah Ha" routine from their vaudeville days. "Back to the Woods" is one of their relatively rare costume efforts. The highlight of "Violent Is the Word for Curly" is a pleasant little vaudeville song about the alphabet. In "Three Dumb Clucks," Curly gets to play a double role. The audio and video are generally good. The film of "Three Little Pirates" used for the transfer to DVD, however, shows a defect 10 minutes into the episode in the form of vertical lines flickering to the left of the picture, which some might find distracting. --Frank Behrens


Laurel & Hardy: The Essential Collection

Review "Crash Goes the Hash" (1944, short number 77 in the Columbia series) is pretty much a rehash of material often used by the Three Stooges. Mistaken for reporters, they are sent to a highbrow party to get a story. They pose as cook and butlers, causing the expected chaos, even down to the old parrot-in-the-turkey routine and the one in which a Stooge has one arm in the baddie's jacket sleeve during a fight. Perhaps it is as an acknowledgment of all this recycling that we have the butler commenting that they remind him of the Three Stooges, to which Curly replies, "That's an insult."

"From Nurse to Worse" (1940, number 49) has a rare bit of symmetry in that a "friend" who gets them involved in an insurance scam at the start of the film gets his comeuppance at the end of it. Curly gets to do an extended dog imitation to prove he's nuts and collect on the insurance; but when faced with surgery, it's time to escape--into a dog catcher's wagon to facilitate an extra routine inside a fumigation room.

The third film, "G.I. Wanna Go Home" (1946, number 94)--the word Go is missing on both the box and the tape label!--starts with a touch of realism as the boys are in uniforms looking for a lift. Because of the housing shortage, they cannot get married and take up residence in an open yard; but after another tired round with a parrot in a turkey, a truck arbitrarily ruins their domicile. They manage to find a small dwelling, the bedroom of which consists of two sets of three-tiered bunk beds. The brides simply disappear into the bathroom as another old routine of Curly having to take the top berth is repeated. This is not a particularly satisfying entry as Curly is restrained by health problems. --Frank Behrens


Abbott & Costello: The Complete Universal Pictures Collection

Review "We Want Our Mummy" (1939, short number 37) is arguably one of the top Three Stooges shorts of the 190 the team made for Columbia. As were many of their early films, this one is loaded with shameless puns and one of their most imaginative entrances, this time as private detectives. There is also the priceless routine in which Curly is swimming in what he thinks is a pool out in the desert, and his body movements are so perfect that one can almost see the water. The influence of the Boris Karloff film The Mummy (1932) is obvious, even down to the mummy's slowly opening its eyes behind Curly's back. A real gem.

"Restless Knights" (1935, number 6) has such a flimsy plot that a good deal of the running time is taken up by only two routines. In the first, the boys stage a wrestling match; in the second, they try to knock out three guards by luring them away from a card game one at a time. Neither really works and the "punch line" in which they knock out the very queen they were sent to save is lame even for this series. Things are saved a little by the presence of Walter Brennan as their dying father, who lets us know the source of the boys' face-slapping genes.

"Yes, We Have No Bonanza" (1939, number 39) has the Stooges out West where they are singing waiters who go prospecting to get three attractive performers out of debt and into marriage. What they find is a bonanza of hidden money and bonds ("Ain't nature wonderful," one of them exclaims), which leads to the inevitable confrontation with the crooks and a chase on a wooden horse. Good vintage Stooging. --Frank Behrens


The Three Stooges: The Movie

Review

Fun with The Three Stooges in six zany episodes:

A Plumbing We Will Go(1940): Three would-be plumbers mistake pipes filled with wires for water pipes. Dudley Dickerson's battle in the kitchen is a highlight.

Men In Black(1934): Medical malpractice is an understatement when describing what the Stooges do to the Los Arms Hospital, where they dispense unorthodox advice, flirt with the nurses and battle a babbling intercom system. With: Dell Henderson, Jeannie Roberts and Billy Gilbert.

Micro-phonies (1945): When Curly is mistaken for an opera diva, the Stooges find their calling on the stage as Senorita Cucaracha (Curly) and Senors Mucho and Gusto (Larry and Moe). With: Christine McIntyre, Symona Boniface and Gino Corrado.

Punch Drunks(1934): Larry's rendition of Pop Goes The Weasel transforms Curly from a harmless cream puff into a vicious contender, but when Larry's violin breaks, it threatens Curly's boxing career with a TKO. With: Dorothy Granger and Al Hill.

Three Little Pigskins (1934): When the Stooges are mistaken for star football players, they not only find themselves running for goals but running for their lives when they get mixed up with the gorgeous girlfriends of a group of mobsters. With: Lucille Ball, Gertie Green and Phyllis Crane.

Woman Haters(1934): When Larry breaks his oath to the Woman Haters Club by marrying, he is treated like a traitor by his fellow members. But getting out of the marriage may be even more harmful than anything his friends could ever do to him. The Stooges' first short was done entirely in rhyme. With: Marjorie White.


The Three Stooges Collection, Vol. 3: 1940-1942

Review Three Stooges:Whats the Matador [VHS]
The Three Stooges in Orbit

Review Includes 25 years of the Three Stooges unique brand of humor with Moe as boss, Larry the middleman and Curly as their foil. Witness the rise of these comedy icons in this high-spirited collection, which has been re-mastered for the best quality picture and sound. You'll experience the eye-pokes, face slaps, hollow head knocks and knuckle cracks like you've never heard or seen them before.
Snow White and the Three Stooges

Review Originally airing on A&E's Biography channel, this extensive documentary goes behind the scenes of the legendary comedy show THE THREE STOOGES. Over two hours of previously-unseen footage offers viewers an insightful look at the private lives of everyone's favorite funnymen. Interviews with family and friends of the stars, outtakes, and backstage material help to paint a revealing portrait of the men who made up the hugely popular comic trio. **NON STANDARD PRICING**
Lost Horizon [Blu-ray]

Review SPECIAL FEATURES: FULLSCREEN VERSION, MONO SOUND, LANGUAGES: ENGLISH, SPANISH, AND PORTUGUESE, SUBTITLES IN ENGLISH, SPANISH AND PORTUGUESE, DIGITALLY MASTERED AUDIO & VIDEO, EPISODE SELECTIONS: GRIPS, GRUNTS AND GROANS, ALL THE WORLD'S A STOOGE, 3 DUMB CLUCKS, THREE LITTLE PIRATES AND THREE MORE EPISODES.
Dancing Lady

Review If you want to hear "nyuk-nyuk-nyuk" in Spanish and Portuguese as well as in English, then the DVD format is for you. The Three Stooges: All the World's a Stooge gives a generous 124 minutes of seven Curly classics in a random order: "Grips, Grunts and Groans" (1937), "The World's a Stooge" (1941), "3 Dumb Clucks" (1937), "Three Little Pirates" (1946), "Uncivil War Birds" (1946), "Back to the Woods" (1937), and "Violent Is the Word for Curly" (1938). The shorts cover some familiar territory; "Grips, Grunts and Groans" is only the Stooges' 20th short in the Columbia series, and it is practically a rewrite of "Punch Drunks," the second. Here Curly is driven wild by a perfume rather than a song and is put into a wrestling ring rather than a boxing ring. Even the backscreen projection of the crowd is the same one used in the earlier film.

"Three Little Pirates" contains the famous "Mahah, Ah Ha" routine from their vaudeville days. "Back to the Woods" is one of their relatively rare costume efforts. The highlight of "Violent Is the Word for Curly" is a pleasant little vaudeville song about the alphabet. In "Three Dumb Clucks," Curly gets to play a double role. The audio and video are generally good. The film of "Three Little Pirates" used for the transfer to DVD, however, shows a defect 10 minutes into the episode in the form of vertical lines flickering to the left of the picture, which some might find distracting. --Frank Behrens


Forsaking All Others (1934)

Review "Crash Goes the Hash" (1944, short number 77 in the Columbia series) is pretty much a rehash of material often used by the Three Stooges. Mistaken for reporters, they are sent to a highbrow party to get a story. They pose as cook and butlers, causing the expected chaos, even down to the old parrot-in-the-turkey routine and the one in which a Stooge has one arm in the baddie's jacket sleeve during a fight. Perhaps it is as an acknowledgment of all this recycling that we have the butler commenting that they remind him of the Three Stooges, to which Curly replies, "That's an insult."

"From Nurse to Worse" (1940, number 49) has a rare bit of symmetry in that a "friend" who gets them involved in an insurance scam at the start of the film gets his comeuppance at the end of it. Curly gets to do an extended dog imitation to prove he's nuts and collect on the insurance; but when faced with surgery, it's time to escape--into a dog catcher's wagon to facilitate an extra routine inside a fumigation room.

The third film, "G.I. Wanna Go Home" (1946, number 94)--the word Go is missing on both the box and the tape label!--starts with a touch of realism as the boys are in uniforms looking for a lift. Because of the housing shortage, they cannot get married and take up residence in an open yard; but after another tired round with a parrot in a turkey, a truck arbitrarily ruins their domicile. They manage to find a small dwelling, the bedroom of which consists of two sets of three-tiered bunk beds. The brides simply disappear into the bathroom as another old routine of Curly having to take the top berth is repeated. This is not a particularly satisfying entry as Curly is restrained by health problems. --Frank Behrens


Chained

Review "We Want Our Mummy" (1939, short number 37) is arguably one of the top Three Stooges shorts of the 190 the team made for Columbia. As were many of their early films, this one is loaded with shameless puns and one of their most imaginative entrances, this time as private detectives. There is also the priceless routine in which Curly is swimming in what he thinks is a pool out in the desert, and his body movements are so perfect that one can almost see the water. The influence of the Boris Karloff film The Mummy (1932) is obvious, even down to the mummy's slowly opening its eyes behind Curly's back. A real gem.

"Restless Knights" (1935, number 6) has such a flimsy plot that a good deal of the running time is taken up by only two routines. In the first, the boys stage a wrestling match; in the second, they try to knock out three guards by luring them away from a card game one at a time. Neither really works and the "punch line" in which they knock out the very queen they were sent to save is lame even for this series. Things are saved a little by the presence of Walter Brennan as their dying father, who lets us know the source of the boys' face-slapping genes.

"Yes, We Have No Bonanza" (1939, number 39) has the Stooges out West where they are singing waiters who go prospecting to get three attractive performers out of debt and into marriage. What they find is a bonanza of hidden money and bonds ("Ain't nature wonderful," one of them exclaims), which leads to the inevitable confrontation with the crooks and a chase on a wooden horse. Good vintage Stooging. --Frank Behrens


The Letter

Review

Fun with The Three Stooges in six zany episodes:

A Plumbing We Will Go(1940): Three would-be plumbers mistake pipes filled with wires for water pipes. Dudley Dickerson's battle in the kitchen is a highlight.

Men In Black(1934): Medical malpractice is an understatement when describing what the Stooges do to the Los Arms Hospital, where they dispense unorthodox advice, flirt with the nurses and battle a babbling intercom system. With: Dell Henderson, Jeannie Roberts and Billy Gilbert.

Micro-phonies (1945): When Curly is mistaken for an opera diva, the Stooges find their calling on the stage as Senorita Cucaracha (Curly) and Senors Mucho and Gusto (Larry and Moe). With: Christine McIntyre, Symona Boniface and Gino Corrado.

Punch Drunks(1934): Larry's rendition of Pop Goes The Weasel transforms Curly from a harmless cream puff into a vicious contender, but when Larry's violin breaks, it threatens Curly's boxing career with a TKO. With: Dorothy Granger and Al Hill.

Three Little Pigskins (1934): When the Stooges are mistaken for star football players, they not only find themselves running for goals but running for their lives when they get mixed up with the gorgeous girlfriends of a group of mobsters. With: Lucille Ball, Gertie Green and Phyllis Crane.

Woman Haters(1934): When Larry breaks his oath to the Woman Haters Club by marrying, he is treated like a traitor by his fellow members. But getting out of the marriage may be even more harmful than anything his friends could ever do to him. The Stooges' first short was done entirely in rhyme. With: Marjorie White.


The Bride Wore Red

Review Three Stooges:Whats the Matador [VHS]

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