Coleman Hawkins Reviews

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Coleman Hawkins - 7 Classic Albums (4Cd)

Review VOLUME ONE : 4CD set. Collects seven original albums, including "The Hawk In Hi-Fi", "The Hawk Flies High", "Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster", "The Genius Of Coleman Hawkins", "Bean Bags", "Soul" and "Hawk Eyes".
Coleman Hawkins - Seven Classic Albums Vol 2

Review Hawkins adds a laid back interpetation to these allready mellow ballads to achieve the "relaxed" sound of this record.
Young, Lester - 7 Classic Albums

Review HAWKINS COLEMAN NIGHT HAWK
Complete Recordings: 1952-1959 (4CD Box Set)

Review let some jazz spice up your night
12 Classic Albums: 1947-1962

Review An enormous presence in jazz across five decades, Coleman Hawkins provided huge influence for generations of jazz saxophonists who were inspired to pick up their instrument of choice following exposure to Hawkins work. Having begun his career participating in late night Harlem jam sessions, Hawkins quickly rose to fame following his recording of Body And Soul on 11th October 1939 - a tune considered by many to be among the finest jazz numbers ever. From then on, his relentless recording and touring schedules along with the pure quality of his work made him a central figure on the international jazz stage, a reputation he maintained for the rest of his life and beyond. Although by 1960 Hawkins had been in the business for nearly four decades, his contributions to some of the most important albums in modern jazz continued. His playing featured on the song Driva Man on Max Roach s legendary We Insist! (Candid, 1960) - a bold composition in support of the Civil Rights Movement and he performed too on vocalist Abbey Lincoln s Straight Ahead (Candid, 1961), on which he appeared alongside Roach, Eric Dolphy, Mal Waldron and Booker Little. Hawkins made many more notable appearances alongside other important names during the early 1960s, including Duke Ellington, Bud Powell, Oscar Pettiford, Kenny Clarke, Nate Adderley, Howard McGhee and Lester Young. However, it would be on the albums featuring Hawkins as leader on which the sax man s star shone brightest. Always keen to promote new talent , 1960 s Coleman Hawkins And His Orchestra (Crown) and Coleman Hawkins All Stars (Swingville) brought together a pool of young players, including drummer Osie Johnson, trumpeter Thad Jones and pianists Tommy Flanagan and Eddie Costa - although the latter was tragically killed in a car accident two years later. The following year would see the release of two of Hawkins most highly-regarded late period albums: Night Hawk (Swingville, 1961) - which featured a pairing with fellow tenor saxophonist Eddie Lockjaw Davis - and The Hawk Relaxes (Moodsville, 1961), which boasted appearances from pianist Ronnie Bright, Kenny Burrell on guitar, Ron Carter on bass and drummer Andrew Cyrille. Hawkins would also pay tribute to many of the popular standards that had formed the foundation of his career on Good Old Broadway and Make Someone Happy (both Moodsville, 1962). Sadly, by this point, Hawkins was drinking heavily and his recording output has begun to wane, although he still had time to appear alongside Sonny Rollins on Sonny Meets Hawk! (RCA Victor, 1963), and with an impressiveline-up of jazz legends on The Greatest Jazz Concert In The World (Pablo, 1975 - recorded 1967), including Oscar Peterson, Clark Terry, Benny Carter, Zoot Sims, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald and T-Bone Walker. Old age and failing health finally caught up with the Hawk, however, and following a battle with liver disease he passed away aged 64 on 19th May 1969. This four disc set commemorates the last great period of Coleman Hawkins career. Containing over four hours of music from eight complete albums, originally released across the period 1960 to 1962, this collection is a fitting testament to a hugely accomplished musician who was arguably the greatest tenor saxophonist of the entire jazz spectrum.
9 Classic Albums - Art Tatum

Review Hawkins told one interviewer that he was 'full-grown' at around the age of thirteen, while he claimed to another that when he joined Mamie Smith he was too immature to be let out on his own. Mamie Smith could be a sore point. Occasionally, he would refuse to countenance any reference to her. And he tended to be evasive about his time in New York after he joined Fletcher Henderson. His friends, pastimes, practice routines are mysteries. One thing is indisputable - Hawkins had a prodigious capacity for alcohol. And if the liquid on offer was prohibition rotgut, well, so be it. He could drink, by the way, without appearing drunk. His public persona was that of a cultured, confident boulevardier. He was born in 1904 in St Joseph, Missouri. When he showed musical talent his parents encouraged it. He studied piano and the cello. At the age of nine he was given a C-Melody saxophone and from then seems to have been uninterested in other instruments. In 1921 he joined Mamie Smith. He could hardly have found a better gig. Smith's set-up was one of the tightest of its time - well-managed and with a crowd pleasing repertoire. Having switched to tenor sax, he was billed as 'Saxophone Boy', said to have been paid $50 a week. In 1924, he joined Fletcher Henderson, whose band was a musical aristocracy - where musical revolution was in the air and excellence was everyday. Based in New York, it was a source of session player talent. Hawkins' genius emerged slowly. The reason was simple: he had to work things out for himself inspired by, among others, the virtuosity of pianist Art Tatum, When Hawkins did first record with his own 'voice' it was as part of the coterie of New York session players, typified by the two Little Chocolate Dandies cuts. In his short breaks, he shines as he rarely would with Henderson for another couple of years. For the next forty years he was an influential visitor to the studio. This set represents a selection of his best prewar work.
12 Classic Albums: 1953-1962 (6CDs)

Review Hawkins is truly "At Ease" on this 1960 recording.
Complete Recordings: 1959-1962 (4CD Box Set)

Review Book by
8 Classic Albums - Duke Ellington

Review Coleman Hawkins and Ben Webster first met at a Kansas City jam session at which Hawkins finally encountered his match in local tenors Webster, Herschel Evans, and Lester Young. The all-night meeting has become the stuff of legend (and a continuous thread in Robert Altman's film Kansas City, though there it's reduced to two tenors). Recorded by Norman Granz, this 1957 meeting supports the two with fine accompaniment that includes Oscar Peterson, Ray Brown, and Herb Ellis. The material includes the great "Blues for Yolanda," with a honking, squeaking solo that suggests Hawkins is the father of all R&B tenor saxophonists as well as those in jazz, while "Rosalita" has an engaging Latin beat. There's also plenty of room for the two to display their ballad art, but there's no real competition between the two big-toned, gruff tenorists, each a mature artist enjoying the highest challenge a peer might offer. --Stuart Broomer
13 Classic Albums: 1954-1960

Review VOLUME ONE : 4CD set. Collects seven original albums, including "The Hawk In Hi-Fi", "The Hawk Flies High", "Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster", "The Genius Of Coleman Hawkins", "Bean Bags", "Soul" and "Hawk Eyes".
12 Classic Albums: 1956-1962 [6CD]

Review Hawkins adds a laid back interpetation to these allready mellow ballads to achieve the "relaxed" sound of this record.
The Hawk Relaxes [Reissue]

Review HAWKINS COLEMAN NIGHT HAWK
Night Hawk

Review let some jazz spice up your night
The Hawk Flies High

Review An enormous presence in jazz across five decades, Coleman Hawkins provided huge influence for generations of jazz saxophonists who were inspired to pick up their instrument of choice following exposure to Hawkins work. Having begun his career participating in late night Harlem jam sessions, Hawkins quickly rose to fame following his recording of Body And Soul on 11th October 1939 - a tune considered by many to be among the finest jazz numbers ever. From then on, his relentless recording and touring schedules along with the pure quality of his work made him a central figure on the international jazz stage, a reputation he maintained for the rest of his life and beyond. Although by 1960 Hawkins had been in the business for nearly four decades, his contributions to some of the most important albums in modern jazz continued. His playing featured on the song Driva Man on Max Roach s legendary We Insist! (Candid, 1960) - a bold composition in support of the Civil Rights Movement and he performed too on vocalist Abbey Lincoln s Straight Ahead (Candid, 1961), on which he appeared alongside Roach, Eric Dolphy, Mal Waldron and Booker Little. Hawkins made many more notable appearances alongside other important names during the early 1960s, including Duke Ellington, Bud Powell, Oscar Pettiford, Kenny Clarke, Nate Adderley, Howard McGhee and Lester Young. However, it would be on the albums featuring Hawkins as leader on which the sax man s star shone brightest. Always keen to promote new talent , 1960 s Coleman Hawkins And His Orchestra (Crown) and Coleman Hawkins All Stars (Swingville) brought together a pool of young players, including drummer Osie Johnson, trumpeter Thad Jones and pianists Tommy Flanagan and Eddie Costa - although the latter was tragically killed in a car accident two years later. The following year would see the release of two of Hawkins most highly-regarded late period albums: Night Hawk (Swingville, 1961) - which featured a pairing with fellow tenor saxophonist Eddie Lockjaw Davis - and The Hawk Relaxes (Moodsville, 1961), which boasted appearances from pianist Ronnie Bright, Kenny Burrell on guitar, Ron Carter on bass and drummer Andrew Cyrille. Hawkins would also pay tribute to many of the popular standards that had formed the foundation of his career on Good Old Broadway and Make Someone Happy (both Moodsville, 1962). Sadly, by this point, Hawkins was drinking heavily and his recording output has begun to wane, although he still had time to appear alongside Sonny Rollins on Sonny Meets Hawk! (RCA Victor, 1963), and with an impressiveline-up of jazz legends on The Greatest Jazz Concert In The World (Pablo, 1975 - recorded 1967), including Oscar Peterson, Clark Terry, Benny Carter, Zoot Sims, Duke Ellington, Ella Fitzgerald and T-Bone Walker. Old age and failing health finally caught up with the Hawk, however, and following a battle with liver disease he passed away aged 64 on 19th May 1969. This four disc set commemorates the last great period of Coleman Hawkins career. Containing over four hours of music from eight complete albums, originally released across the period 1960 to 1962, this collection is a fitting testament to a hugely accomplished musician who was arguably the greatest tenor saxophonist of the entire jazz spectrum.
At Ease w/Coleman Hawkins: Rudy Van Gelder Remasters

Review Hawkins told one interviewer that he was 'full-grown' at around the age of thirteen, while he claimed to another that when he joined Mamie Smith he was too immature to be let out on his own. Mamie Smith could be a sore point. Occasionally, he would refuse to countenance any reference to her. And he tended to be evasive about his time in New York after he joined Fletcher Henderson. His friends, pastimes, practice routines are mysteries. One thing is indisputable - Hawkins had a prodigious capacity for alcohol. And if the liquid on offer was prohibition rotgut, well, so be it. He could drink, by the way, without appearing drunk. His public persona was that of a cultured, confident boulevardier. He was born in 1904 in St Joseph, Missouri. When he showed musical talent his parents encouraged it. He studied piano and the cello. At the age of nine he was given a C-Melody saxophone and from then seems to have been uninterested in other instruments. In 1921 he joined Mamie Smith. He could hardly have found a better gig. Smith's set-up was one of the tightest of its time - well-managed and with a crowd pleasing repertoire. Having switched to tenor sax, he was billed as 'Saxophone Boy', said to have been paid $50 a week. In 1924, he joined Fletcher Henderson, whose band was a musical aristocracy - where musical revolution was in the air and excellence was everyday. Based in New York, it was a source of session player talent. Hawkins' genius emerged slowly. The reason was simple: he had to work things out for himself inspired by, among others, the virtuosity of pianist Art Tatum, When Hawkins did first record with his own 'voice' it was as part of the coterie of New York session players, typified by the two Little Chocolate Dandies cuts. In his short breaks, he shines as he rarely would with Henderson for another couple of years. For the next forty years he was an influential visitor to the studio. This set represents a selection of his best prewar work.
Coleman Hawkins Encounters Ben Webster

Review Hawkins is truly "At Ease" on this 1960 recording.
Lester Young with Oscar Peterson Trio

Review Book by
Body & Soul

Review Coleman Hawkins and Ben Webster first met at a Kansas City jam session at which Hawkins finally encountered his match in local tenors Webster, Herschel Evans, and Lester Young. The all-night meeting has become the stuff of legend (and a continuous thread in Robert Altman's film Kansas City, though there it's reduced to two tenors). Recorded by Norman Granz, this 1957 meeting supports the two with fine accompaniment that includes Oscar Peterson, Ray Brown, and Herb Ellis. The material includes the great "Blues for Yolanda," with a honking, squeaking solo that suggests Hawkins is the father of all R&B tenor saxophonists as well as those in jazz, while "Rosalita" has an engaging Latin beat. There's also plenty of room for the two to display their ballad art, but there's no real competition between the two big-toned, gruff tenorists, each a mature artist enjoying the highest challenge a peer might offer. --Stuart Broomer

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