Bonnie Raitt Reviews

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The Best of Bonnie Raitt

Review With nine Grammy Awards, more than 15 million album sales and a membership in the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame under her belt, this babe from Burbank, California has established herself as the world's top rock-'n'-soul blues woman. The first-ever "best-of" for this wonderful vocalist and guitar slinger, this definitive collection rounds up 18 classics from Bonnie's best-selling Capitol albums.
The Bonnie Raitt Collection

Review With Dig In Deep, her twentieth album, Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Bonnie Raitt comes out swinging. The follow-up to 2012’s triumphant Slipstream—the Grammy-winning, Top Ten-charting first release on her own Redwing Records label—the new record illustrates the delicate balance of consistency and risk-taking that has defined Raitt’s remarkable career for more than forty-five years.
Dig In Deep

Review After 17 years of impressing blues fans and nibbling at the pop charts, Raitt reached #1 and won four Grammys with this 1989 triumph. The title hit and smash Something to Talk About join Thing Called Love; Have a Heart; Real Man , and more of her best!
Nick Of Time

Review Nick of Time is the watershed moment in Bonnie Raitt's recording career, the sound of a survivor finding new focus and purpose in her art after nearly 20 years of generally superb, commercially underachieving recordings. An exquisite interpretive singer and formidable guitarist who'd long ago honed her bluesy chops, Raitt raised the stakes by mixing the usual gourmet spread of smart cover choices with her own candid songs--and she knocked one over the fence with the opening track, the album's title song and a moving confession of a boomer's anxieties about age, death, and the impermanence of love. "Nick of Time" catapulted a feisty rock tomboy into a new station that made her as admired by female fans as the stage door johnnies who'd long loved her rock technique, and she covered the bet with other outside songs from John Hiatt ("Thing Called Love"), Bonnie Hayes ("Love Letter," "Have a Heart"), and Jerry L. Williams ("Real Man") that resonated with her persona as a tough, smart, but ultimately tender woman. --Sam Sutherland
The Essential James Taylor

Review 2012 album from the Grammy winning singer, songwriter and musician. her first album since 2005's Souls Alike. Produced by Joe Henry, the album is her return to the music scene following the deaths of her parents and brother. The album was recorded with her longtime touring band as well as a handful of tracks with top-level musicians such as Bill Frisell. Features the first single 'Right Down The Line', a cover of the Gerry Rafferty hit.
Bonnie Raitt

Review UK-only five CD set containing a quintet of albums from the American singer/songwriter. Each album comes in a mini-LP sleeve with all housed in attractive slipcase. Includes the albums Streetlights, Home Plate, Sweet Forgiveness, The Glow and Green Light. All of the albums in this box set are currently unavailable in the US! Warner. 2011.
Luck Of The Draw

Review Bonnie's brand of folky-blues shines on Bluebird; Finest Lovin' Man, and more!
The Very Best of Sheryl Crow

Review Never mind the Radcliffe education--Bonnie Raitt's real schooling occurred off-campus, in the folk and blues clubs of the Northeast, where she opened shows for legends such as Mississippi Fred McDowell, Buddy Guy and Junior Wells, Arthur "Big Boy" Crudup, and others. Raitt's self-titled debut, recorded when she was only 21 years old, is a stunner that still holds up decades later. Her slide-guitar skills are already in place, and her choice of material--which includes a reading for Stephen Stills's folk-rock gem "Bluebird," a sinuous take of Robert Johnson's classic "Walkin' Blues," a bluesy reworking of the Marvelettes' "Danger Heartbreak Dead Ahead," and a pair of fine originals ("Thank You" and "Finest Lovin' Man")--is impeccable. Best of all are two songs from Raitt's mentor, Sippie Wallace--"Women Be Wise" and the startlingly randy "Mighty Tight Woman." It was clear from the beginning that Raitt's was a career to watch. --Daniel Durchholz
Linda Ronstadt's Greatest Hits, Vol. 1 & 2

Review 1990 digitally remastered collection out-of-print domestically.
Slipstream, Bonnie Raitt

Review When Bonnie Raitt collected four Grammies for her 1989 multiplatinum breakthrough Nick of Time, it offered sweet justification for fans that had followed her through years of great recordings but plenty of hard luck in terms of commercial success. The Bonnie Raitt Collection shows why those fans were right all along. From the early blues-mama stylings of "Give It Up or Let Me Go" and "Love Me Like a Man" to the increased pop sophistication she brought to songs like her funky reworking of Del Shannon's "Runaway" and Bryan Adams's straight-ahead rocker "No Way to Treat a Lady," the set offers a worthwhile sampling of the decade and a half she spent recording for the Warner Bros. label. Of special note are a pair of live recordings; a previously unreleased version of "Women Be Wise," featuring one of Raitt's primary mentors, Sippie Wallace; and a duet with John Prine on "Angel from Montgomery" that first appeared on the Grammy-winning Tribute to Steve Goodman. If you only recently discovered Raitt, this collection will help you decide which of her earlier works to sample next. --Daniel Durchholz
The Very Best of Emmylou Harris: Heartaches and Highways

Review Raitt,Bonnie ~ Luck Of The Draw
Dig In Deep

Review As its title makes clear, the 1991 sequel to Bonnie Raitt's platinum breakthrough on Nick Of Time takes nothing for granted. Raitt had achieved sobriety, renewed commercial focus, and then the payday that the prior album yielded, but Luck Of The Draw mirrors an even fiercer determination to make music as if her life depended on it. Again teamed with producer Don Was, Raitt surpasses herself with her best album to date: her wonderfully lush, blues-rimmed voice and sinuous slide guitar wrap themselves around a dozen potent songs culled from a typically shrewd mix of writers including Paul Brady, John Hiatt, Bonnie Hayes, Shirley Eikhard, and Billy Vera, and Raitt herself turns in her most generous batch of originals yet. Sympathetic guests include Brady and Delbert McClinton on harmony vocals, Richard Thompson on guitar, and Heartbreaker Benmont Tench on organ, in a program including the sassy "Something to Talk About," the sultry "Slow Ride," a soaring "Not the Only One," and the heartbreaking "I Can't Make You Love Me." This isn't luck, it's artistry. --Sam Sutherland
Slipstream, Bonnie Raitt

Review 1972 classic with Nothing Seems to Matter and Too Long at the Fair !
The Best of Bonnie Raitt

Review 1988 release with Guilty; Cry like a Rainstorm , and more!
I Still Do

Review With nine Grammy Awards, more than 15 million album sales and a membership in the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of Fame under her belt, this babe from Burbank, California has established herself as the world's top rock-'n'-soul blues woman. The first-ever "best-of" for this wonderful vocalist and guitar slinger, this definitive collection rounds up 18 classics from Bonnie's best-selling Capitol albums.
Blue & Lonesome

Review With Dig In Deep, her twentieth album, Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Bonnie Raitt comes out swinging. The follow-up to 2012’s triumphant Slipstream—the Grammy-winning, Top Ten-charting first release on her own Redwing Records label—the new record illustrates the delicate balance of consistency and risk-taking that has defined Raitt’s remarkable career for more than forty-five years.
Keep Me Singing

Review After 17 years of impressing blues fans and nibbling at the pop charts, Raitt reached #1 and won four Grammys with this 1989 triumph. The title hit and smash Something to Talk About join Thing Called Love; Have a Heart; Real Man , and more of her best!
Day Breaks

Review Nick of Time is the watershed moment in Bonnie Raitt's recording career, the sound of a survivor finding new focus and purpose in her art after nearly 20 years of generally superb, commercially underachieving recordings. An exquisite interpretive singer and formidable guitarist who'd long ago honed her bluesy chops, Raitt raised the stakes by mixing the usual gourmet spread of smart cover choices with her own candid songs--and she knocked one over the fence with the opening track, the album's title song and a moving confession of a boomer's anxieties about age, death, and the impermanence of love. "Nick of Time" catapulted a feisty rock tomboy into a new station that made her as admired by female fans as the stage door johnnies who'd long loved her rock technique, and she covered the bet with other outside songs from John Hiatt ("Thing Called Love"), Bonnie Hayes ("Love Letter," "Have a Heart"), and Jerry L. Williams ("Real Man") that resonated with her persona as a tough, smart, but ultimately tender woman. --Sam Sutherland
Bonnie Raitt

Review 2012 album from the Grammy winning singer, songwriter and musician. her first album since 2005's Souls Alike. Produced by Joe Henry, the album is her return to the music scene following the deaths of her parents and brother. The album was recorded with her longtime touring band as well as a handful of tracks with top-level musicians such as Bill Frisell. Features the first single 'Right Down The Line', a cover of the Gerry Rafferty hit.
Memphis Rock And Soul

Review UK-only five CD set containing a quintet of albums from the American singer/songwriter. Each album comes in a mini-LP sleeve with all housed in attractive slipcase. Includes the albums Streetlights, Home Plate, Sweet Forgiveness, The Glow and Green Light. All of the albums in this box set are currently unavailable in the US! Warner. 2011.

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