Ben Sharpsteen Reviews

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Pinocchio (1940) (With Bonus Content)

Review Along with Fantasia and Fantasia 2000, the anthology set contains a third disc that examines a segment of both movies in detail. Each segment has an introduction that has experts (including Leonard Maltin), producer Roy E. Disney, or the
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs (Plus Bonus Features)

Review Along with Fantasia and Fantasia 2000, the anthology set contains a third disc that examines a segment of both movies in detail. Each segment has an introduction that has experts (including Leonard Maltin), producer Roy E. Disney, or the animators setting up the piece's history. Notes on the music and dozens of design photos are included on all the segments, although others offer more intriguing features. Abandoned animation is shown on many segments, as are a few behind-the-scenes shorts; the most intriguing are experts from Walt Disney's hosted documentaries on how his company made movies. As for the photos, they are awkwardly catalogued and only the most patient of viewers would want to look at all of them. In some segments, though, these images are entertainingly produced as a "story reel," presenting these images--rough animation, sketches, pastel paintings--with the musical accompaniment. For those looking for a more well-rounded view of the films, the two one-hour documentaries on each film's disc lay the groundwork, but none of the anthology looks at how the first film was seen through the years or gives time to anyone who wasn't gung-ho about every element of the films. There is hardly a mention of embarrassing stereotypes that were matted (and still are) out of the "Pastoral" segment, or the intriguing aspect of the film as a '60s icon for the ultimate head-trip. Disney does let their guard down to show sequences that were being readied in 1940 for future editions (including a recently restored short scored to "Clair de Lune"). Most tantalizing is a look at how the special effects were done in the original film. The guide is a scrapbook that one of the technicians kept and was discovered only in 1990. Fans can only hope a reproduction will be made available someday. --Doug Thomas
Bambi (1942) (With Bonus Content)

Review Walt Disney was supreme at creating the kind of fun that the whole world could appreciate and this fourth volume featuring Mickey Mouse and other memorable Disney characters includes The Reluctant Dragon (1941), The Goddess of Spring (1934), The Little House (1952), For Whom The Bulls Toil (1953) and Polar Trappers (1938). Color/54 min/NR/fullscreen.
Dumbo

Review Join the world's most beloved cartoon characters in this new collection of wild and wacky classic animated adventures. It's all downhill when Goofy's car separates from the trailer carrying Mickey and Donald in the edge-of-your-seat hilarious thriller, "Mickey's Trailer." Then, the nephews are in for quite a lot of laughs as Uncle Donald tries to teach them how to chop wood, set up a tent, and avoid scuffles with hungry bears in "Good Scouts." The whole family will love every minute of these 8 laughter-packed escapades! This hour of extreme fun includes: "Mickey’s Trailer"; "No Sail"; "Good Scouts"; "Hello Aloha"; "Old Sequoia"; "How To Ride A Horse"; "Trailer Horn"; and, "Two Weeks Vacation."
The Lion King: The Walt Disney Signature Collection (With Bonus Content)

Review Join your favorite Disney pals as they celebrate some of Goofy's funniest moments in this sidesplitting collection of cartoon treasures. Goofy's out of the doghouse and starring in his own collection of seven short films. It's time for fun at work with Donald and Mickey in "Clock Cleaners." Then, in "Father's Week-End," keeping an eye on Junior makes for a nonstop day of so-called rest. Hang on for hilarity when Goofy gets a boat in "Aquamania" and more!
Alice In Wonderland

Review Along with Fantasia and Fantasia 2000, the anthology set contains a third disc that examines a segment of both movies in detail. Each segment has an introduction that has experts (including Leonard Maltin), producer Roy E. Disney, or the
The Sword in the Stone

Review Along with Fantasia and Fantasia 2000, the anthology set contains a third disc that examines a segment of both movies in detail. Each segment has an introduction that has experts (including Leonard Maltin), producer Roy E. Disney, or the animators setting up the piece's history. Notes on the music and dozens of design photos are included on all the segments, although others offer more intriguing features. Abandoned animation is shown on many segments, as are a few behind-the-scenes shorts; the most intriguing are experts from Walt Disney's hosted documentaries on how his company made movies. As for the photos, they are awkwardly catalogued and only the most patient of viewers would want to look at all of them. In some segments, though, these images are entertainingly produced as a "story reel," presenting these images--rough animation, sketches, pastel paintings--with the musical accompaniment. For those looking for a more well-rounded view of the films, the two one-hour documentaries on each film's disc lay the groundwork, but none of the anthology looks at how the first film was seen through the years or gives time to anyone who wasn't gung-ho about every element of the films. There is hardly a mention of embarrassing stereotypes that were matted (and still are) out of the "Pastoral" segment, or the intriguing aspect of the film as a '60s icon for the ultimate head-trip. Disney does let their guard down to show sequences that were being readied in 1940 for future editions (including a recently restored short scored to "Clair de Lune"). Most tantalizing is a look at how the special effects were done in the original film. The guide is a scrapbook that one of the technicians kept and was discovered only in 1990. Fans can only hope a reproduction will be made available someday. --Doug Thomas
Robin Hood

Review Walt Disney was supreme at creating the kind of fun that the whole world could appreciate and this fourth volume featuring Mickey Mouse and other memorable Disney characters includes The Reluctant Dragon (1941), The Goddess of Spring (1934), The Little House (1952), For Whom The Bulls Toil (1953) and Polar Trappers (1938). Color/54 min/NR/fullscreen.
The Aristocats

Review Join the world's most beloved cartoon characters in this new collection of wild and wacky classic animated adventures. It's all downhill when Goofy's car separates from the trailer carrying Mickey and Donald in the edge-of-your-seat hilarious thriller, "Mickey's Trailer." Then, the nephews are in for quite a lot of laughs as Uncle Donald tries to teach them how to chop wood, set up a tent, and avoid scuffles with hungry bears in "Good Scouts." The whole family will love every minute of these 8 laughter-packed escapades! This hour of extreme fun includes: "Mickey’s Trailer"; "No Sail"; "Good Scouts"; "Hello Aloha"; "Old Sequoia"; "How To Ride A Horse"; "Trailer Horn"; and, "Two Weeks Vacation."
Beauty and the Beast (1991)(Plus Bonus Features)

Review Join your favorite Disney pals as they celebrate some of Goofy's funniest moments in this sidesplitting collection of cartoon treasures. Goofy's out of the doghouse and starring in his own collection of seven short films. It's time for fun at work with Donald and Mickey in "Clock Cleaners." Then, in "Father's Week-End," keeping an eye on Junior makes for a nonstop day of so-called rest. Hang on for hilarity when Goofy gets a boat in "Aquamania" and more!

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